Bitcoin Transaction Сonfirmation - BitcoinWiki

Ledger Live adds Coin control: Here's why that matters.

Ledger Live adds Coin control: Here's why that matters.
Ledger Live version 2.11.1 (download link) adds Coin control for power users.
The coin control feature gives advanced users more granular control over their wallets. It enables them to change how and which coins are selected when making transactions. This increases their ability to manage their privacy and the network fees they will have to pay to spend their account balance.
More control over your coins

How does it work?

The account balance for Bitcoin and its derivatives consists of all the unspent transaction outputs (UTXOs) in the account. You can think of UTXOs as the coins in a regular wallet. When you receive money, you collect coins in your wallet. Then, when you want to make a payment, you get to choose which coins you pick from your wallet. Do you pick the largest coins first? Or do you want to spend all the smaller value coins to lighten up your wallet? Similar considerations can be made when creating a Bitcoin or Bitcoin derivative (altcoin) transaction.
Before the Coin Control feature was released, all transactions involving Bitcoin (and altcoins) automatically selected their coins using the First-In-First-Out (FIFO) algorithm. This strategy includes the oldest coin in the account, and when the amount is not sufficient the second-oldest coin is added, and so forth.
As of Ledger Live version 2.11.1, users are able to make use of a dedicated Coin Control tool to choose the coin selection strategy and the coins that may be spent.

Using Coin control in Ledger Live

Coin control is available in Advanced options in the Send flow
  1. Click on Send, choose an account to debit, and enter a recipient address. Click on Continue.
  2. Enter an amount and click on Advanced options. You will then see: - The currently selected, default coin selection strategy: Oldest coins first (FIFO). - A toggle to enable Replace-By-Fee (RBF). - A toggle to include coins from unconfirmed, replaceable transactions.
  3. Click on Coin control. The coin control modal opens.
  4. Select a Coin selection strategy from the dropdown menu: - Oldest coins first (FIFO). This is the default strategy that spends the oldest coins first. - Minimize fees (optimize size). This strategy tries to minimize the byte size of the transaction by spending the lowest number of UTXOs. This results in a low network fee. - Minimize future fees (merge coins), This strategy includes the maximum number of inputs so that a potential future price rise does not make smaller UTXOs economically unspendable. If the price of a crypto asset increases too much, small UTXOs may become worth less than the cost of the network fees to spend them.
  5. Select which coins may not be included in the selection by unticking their checkbox. The SELECTED indicator shows which coins will be included in the transaction. By changing the selection strategy and/or coins to include, the user has precise control over which coins end up being spent. The Coins to spend and Change to return indicators show how much is spent from and returned to the account.
  6. Click on Done to return to the Send flow to verify and send the transaction.
The coin control window lets you select the strategy as well as pick the coins. Coins marked SELECTED will be included in the transaction.

Coin status

The following statuses can be displayed for a coin:
  • Coins received in a transaction with 0 confirmations without RBF enabled: PENDING
  • Coins received in a transaction with 0 confirmations with RBF enabled: REPLACEABLE
  • Coins received in a transaction with 1337 confirmations: 1337 CONFIRMATIONS
By enabling the toggle Include coins from unconfirmed, replaceable transactions, replaceable transactions can be selected in the Coin control screen.

The Privacy use case

One of the main use cases for Coin control is to protect one’s privacy. UTXOs are, unfortunately, not perfectly fungible due to their unique history on the blockchain. Therefore, users may want to spend coins from different sources without mixing them together, because this would indicate to an outside observer of the blockchain that these addresses belong to the same account. For instance, if one were to spend coins bought on a KYC exchange, which are associated with the user’s identity, together with coins bought anonymously using cash, the anonymous coins could be linked to the user’s identity.
Another example would be that you would like to prevent spending a high-value coin for smaller purchases because this would unnecessarily show the person you’re paying how much you have. This is similar to not showing the boulanger how much is on your bank account when buying a baguette.

Let us know what you think!

We are excited to release this new feature because we think it will fulfill real needs of an important part of our users. This version of Ledger Live marks an important milestone, but we will continue working on more features that our community wants.
So, we invite you to try out Coin control in Ledger Live and let us know what you think! All feedback is welcome on this thread, on ledgerwallet, and you can send suggestions or get help through our official contact form.
We'd like to close out by underlining our commitment to the Bitcoin community, and our willingness to build the best wallet ecosystem for newbies as well as for power users.
submitted by fabnormal to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

the year 2020 in Bitcoin Cash so far: a detailed history

the year 2020 in Bitcoin Cash so far: a detailed history
What follows at the bottom is a four page long chronological overview of what happened in BCH in 2020 so far. To make it more digestable and fun to read I start with my narrating of the story.
My attempt was to remain as objective as possible and "let the facts speak for themselve" with everything sourced. I also link to many read.cash articles, the decision of which are the important ones to include is certainly not easy, I count on the rest of the community if I overlooked anything important.

summary & my narrating of the story:
The year started out relatively calm, with cashfusion in "the news" and an older ongoing controversy between Amaury and Roger Ver being worked out. Starting Jan 22nd all debate broke loose with the announcement of “Infrastructure Funding Plan for Bitcoin Cash” by Jiang Zhuoer of BTC.TOP. To illustrate this point 2 days later coinspice ran the title " Roger Ver Praises Vigorous Debate, [...]" and 6 days, less than a week, later Chris Pacia made a read.cash post titled "The 253rd "Thoughts on developer funding" Article" which might have been only a slight exaggeration or he might have been counting. Part of the reason of the tsunami was the lack of worked out details. By the time of Pacia's post a lot had changed: Both BU, Bitcoin Verde and a group of miners had made announcements not to go along with "the plan".
On feb 1st, the second version of the IFP was announced by Jiang Zhuoer in a post “BCH miner donation plan update”. Two weeks later on Feb 15th, the third iteration was announced by Bitcoin ABC which was to be activated by hashrate voting and on the same day Flipstarter was introduced, a sign of the search for alternative solutions. After a few more days and a few more people coming out more against the IFP (including Jonald Fyookball, Mark Lundeberg & Josh Ellithorpe), BCHN was announced on feb 20th with a formal release a week later. Also feb 27th, the DAA was brought back into the conversation by Jonathan Toomim with his " The BCH difficulty adjustment algorithm is broken. Here's how to fix it." video. By early march the IFP was effectively dead with its author Jiang Zhuoer vowing to vote against it. This became clear to everyone when ABC, a day later sudddenly shifted gears towards non-protocol, donation based funding: the IFP was dead. End march ABCs 2020 Business Plan was announced as a way to raise $3.3 million. Mid april to mid may was the high time for voluntary funding with four node implementations and General Protocols, a BCH DeFi Startup successfully raising funds.
By May 15th, the 6th HF network upgrade things had pretty much cooled down. The upgraded included nothing controversial and even saw an unexpected doubling in the unconfirmed transaction chain. June 15th a month later things started to heat up again with the BCHN announcement to remove the "poison pill" or "automatic replay protection". 8th Jul Jonathan Toomim posted "BCH protocol upgrade proposal: Use ASERT as the new DAA" which promised the solution to the long dragging DAA problem. Jul 23th however an unexpected twist occurred when Amaury Séchet posted "Announcing the Grasberg DAA" an incompatible, alternative solution. This, again, sparked a ton of debate and discussion. Grasberg lasted just two weeks from Jul 23th to Aug 6th when ABC announced its plans for the november 2020 upgrade but it had successfully united the opposition in the meanwhile. ABCs plan for november included dropping grasberg in favour of aserti3–2d and introducing IFPv4. Now we're here August 8th, the IFP which was declared dead after just over a month (Jan 22-Mar 5) is now back in full force. The rest of the history is still being written but if p2p electronic cash is to succeed in any big regard it's very thinkable that these events will get into history books.

Important resources: coinspice IFP timeline & Compiled list of BCH Miner Dev Fund posts, articles, discussions

History
Jan 13th : “Do CoinJoins Really Require Equal Transaction Amounts for Privacy? Part One: CashFusion” article by BitcoinMagazine [source]
Jan 13th : “Clearing the Way for Cooperation” Read.cash article by Amaury Séchet [source] on the controversy with Roger Ver about the amount of donations over the years
Jan 22nd : “Infrastructure Funding Plan for Bitcoin Cash” IFPv1 announced by Jiang Zhuoer of BTC.TOP [source] IFPv1: 12.5% of BCH coinbase rewards which will last for 6 months through a Hong Kong-based corporation & to be activated on May 15th
Jan 22nd : ”Bitcoin Cash Developers React to Infrastructure Fund Announcement: Cautiously Optimistic” coinspice article including Amaury Séchet, Antony Zegers, Jonald Fyookball & Josh Ellithorpe [source]
Jan 23rd : Jiang Zhuoer reddit AMA [source] [coinspice article]
Jan 23rd : Vitalik weighs in with his take on twitter [source]
Jan 23rd :” On the infrastructure funding plan for Bitcoin Cash” article by Amaury Séchet [source] [coinspice article] in which he proposed to place control of the IFP key in his hands together with Jonald Fyookball and Antony Zegers. . A group of 7 to 12 miners, developers, and businessmen in total would get an advisory function.
Jan 24th : “Bitcoin.com's Clarifications on the Miner Development Fund“ which emphasizes, among other things, the temporary and reversible nature of the proposal [source] [coinspice article]
Jan 24th : “Little Known (But Important!) Facts About the Mining Plan” Read.cash article by Jonald Fyookball in which he defended the IFP and stressed its necessity and temporary nature.
Jan 25th : massive amounts of public debate as documented by coinspice [coinspice article] with Justin Bons, Tobias Ruck and Antony Zegers explaining their take on it.
Jan 26th : public debate continues: “Assessment and proposal re: the Bitcoin Cash infrastructure funding situation” Read.cash article by imaginary_username [source] which was noteworthy in part because the post earned over Earns $1,000+ in BCH [coinspice article] and “The Best Of Intentions: The Dev Tax Is Intended to Benefit Investors But Will Corrupt Us Instead” by Peter Rizun [source]
Jan 27th : “We are a group of miners opposing the BTC.TOP proposal, here's why” article on Read.cash [source] [reddit announcement]
Jan 27th : Bitcoin Unlimited's BUIP 143: Refuse the Coinbase Tax [source][reddit announcement]
Jan 28th : “Bitcoin Verde's Response to the Miner Sponsored Development Fund” read.cash article by Josh Green in which he explains “Bitcoin Verde will not be implementing any node validation that enforces new coinbase rules.” [source]
Jan 28th : “Update on Developer Funding” read.cash article from Bitcoin.com [source] in which they state “As it stands now, Bitcoin.com will not go through with supporting any plan unless there is more agreement in the ecosystem such that the risk of a chain split is negligible.” And that “any funding proposal must be temporary and reversible.” This announcement from bitcoin.com and their mining pool lead the anonymous opposition miners to stand down. [source]
Jan 28th : The 253rd "Thoughts on developer funding" Article – by Chris Pacia, to tackle the “serious misconceptions in the community about how software development works”. He ends on a note of support for the IFP because of lack of realistic alternatives. [source]
Feb 1st: “BCH miner donation plan update” IFPv2 announced by Jiang Zhuoer of BTC.TOP [source] Which changes the donation mechanism so miners directly send part of their coinbase to the projects they wants to donate to. It would be activated with hashrate voting over a 3-month period with a 2/3 in favour requirement. The proposal also introduces a pilot period and a no donation option, Jiang Zhuoer also says he regards 12.% as too much.
Feb 7th: Group of BCH miners led by AsicSeer voice scepticism about the IFP during a reddit AMA [source]
Feb 15th: “On the Miner Infrastructure Funding Plan” article by Bitcoin ABC [source] In which they announce they will implement IFPv3 in their upcoming 0.21.0 release. This version has amount reduced to 5% of block reward and will go in effect with BIP 9 hashratevoting and a whitelist with different projects.
Feb 15th : “Introducing Flipstarter” [source]
Feb 16th :” Bitcoin.com’s stance on the recent block reward diversion proposals” video by Roger Ver on the Bitcoin.com Official Channel. [source] > Ver called Zhuoer’s IFP “clever” but ultimately “problematic.” [coinspice article]
Feb 16th :” BCH miner donation plan update again” read.cash article by Jiang Zhuoer of BTC.TOP [source] In which he briefly outlines the details of IFPv3
Feb 17th : “Latest Thoughts On Infrastructure Mining Plan” post by Jonald Fyookball [source]
Feb 17th : “Regarding the Bitcoin Cash Infrastructure Funding Plan, I am certain now that it should be scrapped immediately.” tweet by Mark Lundeberg [source]
Feb 19th : “Thoughts on the IFP - A Dev Perspective“ read.cash article by Josh Ellithorpe [source]
Feb 20th : “Bitcoin Cash Node” post announcing the new node implementation [source]
Feb 20th : First “Bitcoin Cash Developer Meeting” After IFP Proposal [source]
Feb 24th : “Flipstarter 500k, 6 independent campaigns” post announcing the goal to “fund the BCH ecosystem with 6 independent campaigns and an overall 500,000 USD target” [source]
Feb 27th : BCHN Formally Released [source]
Feb 27th : “The BCH difficulty adjustment algorithm is broken. Here's how to fix it.” Video by Jonathan Toomim [source]
Mar 3th :” Bitcoin Cash Node 2020: plans for May upgrade and beyond” post by BCHN [source]
Mar 4th :”Author of the Bitcoin Cash IFP [Jiang Zhuoer] Vows to Vote Against It, Using Personal Hash in Opposition” [source]
Mar 5th :Bitcoin ABC announces their 2020 Business Plan Fundraising for later in march [source]
Mar 15th : “EatBCH campaign funded! Next: node campaigns.” campaign funded after 11 hours [source]
Mar 30th : Bitcoin ABC 2020 Business Plan [source] $3.3 Million Fundraiser [source]
Apr 17th : Five flipstarter node campaign launched. [source]
Apr 26th : BCHN flipstarter campaign successfully funded. [source]
Apr 27th : VERDE flipstarter campaign successfully funded. [source]
May 4th : KNUTH flipstarter campaign successfully funded. [source]
May 7th : “BCH DeFi Startup General Protocols Raises Over $1 mil“ [source]
May 8th : BCHD flipstarter campaign successfully funded. [source]
May 9th : Deadline for node campaigns, ABC flipstarter campaign not funded. [source]
May 14th : “With IFP Defeated, Bitcoin ABC, ViaBTC & CoinEX CEO Publicly Consider a Bitcoin Cash Foundation” [source]
May 15th : deadline for ABC fundraiser campaign, ends at 55% completed. [source]
May 15th : 6th HF network upgrade -> new opcode op_Reversebytes, increased of the chained transaction limit from 25 to 50, and the improved counting of signature operations using the new “Sigchecks” implementation [source] with the “Controversial Funding Plan Rejected by Miners” [source]
May 25th : “Announcing the SLP Foundation” [source]
Jun 15st : “BCHN lead maintainer report 2020-06-15” announcement to remove the Automatic Replay Protection (a.k.a. the Poison Pill) from BCHN in november [source]
Jun 16st : “So [BCHN] is going to fork off from BCH at the next upgrade. Same old story. […]” tweeted Vin Armani [source]
Jun 21st : “Why Automatic Replay Protection Exists” post by Shammah Chancellor [source]
Jul 7th : “The Popular Stablecoin Tether Is Now Circulating on the Bitcoin Cash Network” [source]
Jul 8th : “BCH protocol upgrade proposal: Use ASERT as the new DAA” post by Jonathan Toomim [source]
Jul 18th : “$6M Worth of Tether on the Bitcoin Cash Chain Highlights the Benefits of SLP Tokens” [source]
Jul 23th : “Announcing the Grasberg DAA” post by Amaury Séchet[source]
Jul 24th : “Thoughts on Grasberg DAA” post by Mark Lundeberg [source]
Jul 29th : CashFusion security audit has been completed [source]
Jul 31st : Electron Cash 4.1.0 release with CashFusion support [source]
4th year, august 2020 – 2021
Aug 1st : “Bitcoin Cash: Scaling the Globe“ Online conference for ForkDay Celebration [source]
Aug 2nd : >“Is there going to be a fork between ABC and BCHN?” > “IMO it is very likely. If not in November, then next May.” – Amaury Séchet
Aug 3rd : “Dark secrets of the Grasberg DAA” post by Jonathan Toomim [source]
Aug 3rd : “Joint Statement On aserti3-2d Algorithm“ post by General Protocols, including Cryptophyl, Read.cash, Software Verde & SpinBCH [source]
Aug 3rd : Knuth announces they will be implementing aserti3-2d as DAA for november. [source]
Aug 3rd : Amaury rage quit from the developer call [source]
Aug 4th : “But why do people care about compensating for historical drift? Seems like a tiny problem and if it's causing this much social discord it seems not even worth bothering to try to fix.” Tweet by Vitalik [source]
Aug 5th : “Bitcoin Cash (BCH) November 2020 Upgrade statement” signed by BCHD, electron cash, VERDE, BU members, BCHN developers, Jonathan Toomim, Mark B. Lundeberg and many others [source]
Aug 5th : “BCHN FAQ on November 2020 Bitcoin Cash network upgrade” [source]
Aug 6th : “Bitcoin ABC’s plan for the November 2020 upgrade” [source] the announcement that they will drop Grasberg in favour of aserti3–2d (ASERT) and will also include FPv4 in which 8% of the blockreward goes to ABC as development funding.
Aug 7th : “Joint Statement from BCH Miners regarding Bitcoin ABC and the November 2020 BCH Upgrade.” Read.cash article by asicseer [source] stating “Over recent months, most miners and pools have switched to BCHN, and presently operate a majority of BCH hashrate.”
Aug 7th : “Simple Ledger Protocol's Joint Statement Regarding Bitcoin ABC on BCH's November 2020 Upgrade” read.cash post by the SLP-Foundation [source]
submitted by Mr-Zwets to btc [link] [comments]

[Weekly Report] BSV News

Dear friends of LivesOne,
Since the Symbiosism Economy Foundation announced the cooperation with BSV, we have introduced BSV in detail, including its history, philosophy, advantages, and the reasons for our choice. LivesOne always pays close attention to the trend of BSV and informs you in time. As we enter the year 2020, good news is coming one after another.
Mining pool reduces BSV transaction fee and anchors legal tender
BSV transaction fees are already the cheapest in major blockchains, but this is not enough. On January 8, the famous Bitcoin mining giant TAAL announced that in order to support blockchain applications that require a large number of transactions, it will reduce the miner rate on the BSV chain and increase the limit value of unconfirmed inherited transactions. Subsequently, the CoinGeek mining pool also issued a statement saying that it would follow up with this adjustment. Any fee reduction will send a clear signal to the market that the cost of using BSV will decrease. It is expected that this change will incentivize more enterprise applications to generate a large number of BSV transactions. Taking this step will generate high transaction volumes and higher total transaction fees.
At present, Bitcoin transaction fees are not expressed in legal tender, but in "sat / byte". Therefore, transaction fees in legal tender price will fluctuate with the fluctuation of the price of bitcoin. This fluctuation will have a greater impact on applications that generate a large number of transactions on the blockchain. Commercial users of the BSV ecosystem have recently begun to explore an alternative transaction fee model that can be priced in legal tender, which provides higher reliability for BSV business applications. This new type of expense market emerged with the greater data and microtransaction capabilities of BSV. However, this is unlikely to happen on the bitcoin core network, because its block is too small, resulting in high transaction costs.
Large enterprises usually want to be able to predict their costs, so stable transaction fees are expected to attract more enterprises to use BSV for data applications. TAAL promises to regularly check the lower BSV transaction fees to maintain stable transaction fees in legal tender. As one of BSV's partners, it is undoubtedly brought real benefits to LivesOne.
Oppose Anonymity and Embrace Regulation
The European Union’s 5th Anti-Money Laundering Directive (5AMLD) came into effect on January 10. The regulation was entered as law on July 9, 2018 in an effort to bring increased transparency to financial transactions for pushing back against money laundering and terrorist financing across Europe. For the first time, 5AMLD is broadening its regulatory scope by including crypto service providers like virtual-fiat exchanges or custodian wallet providers. The idea is make it more plainly knowable who’s participating in crypto transactions. The rationale is that doing so pushes back against money laundering and terrorism financing.
According to an 5AMLD fact sheet, the law will:
European Union is paying close attention to cryptocurrency and has established its first set of rules for how companies in this space must behave. Now it’s on those companies to gain compliance or risk being able to operate at all.
This reminds me of Dr. Craig's emphasis on the existence of BSV: Bitcoin's system should be transparent. It should not be used to fight the government; it should not be used to fight anyone. It can be used for creation, it can be used for construction. I have to say that the vision of BSV is prescient and correct. BSV is an honest system with transparency as its key feature. BSV can be used to create a more secure and honest society.
BSV with unlimited expansion, anti-anonymity, and embrace supervision is the first choice for LivesOne team cooperation. The collaboration between LivesOne and BSV is ongoing, let us look forward to seeing more details.

Symbiosism Economy Foundation
Jan.15th, 2020
submitted by LivesoneToken to LivesOne [link] [comments]

I quit btc.

TL&DR Basically rant why I don’t want to face bitcoin core supporters constant lies and I don’t want to have anything to do with bitcoin core (btc) anymore.
Bitcoin was always about sending safely digital money to anybody, anywhere and without need of central authority. It was very clearly stated in first discussions and first promoting materials, that whole idea is for it to work instantly with no fees, or very little fees and it is for everybody equally and anonymously.
Nobody was ever suggesting that bitcoin is finished product. Probably it is fair to say everybody were expecting some kind of problems and different and unforeseen circumstances that could potentially kill the project any minute and instantly. Many of users could also see potential new use cases and phenomenal possibilities for the future. Bitcoin got quickly recognised as very risky but very promising technology that could change the world. Things like that don’t happened every day.
Evolution of bitcoin was inevitable. Every aspect of bitcoin needed protection and improvement to face problems.
Oh boy, but how I’m surprised what way it all went.
Maximum blocksize was introduce by bitcoin creator as a temporary measure to mitigate problems bitcoin was vulnerable at the time. It was always suppose to be increased when needed and Bitcoin creator (Satoshi Nakamoto) even said how to do it effortlessly. That max block size was trivial temporary fix that not many at the time realised how big obstacle for bitcoin it will become. Unfortunately for all of us, Satoshi left the project, before sorting it out.
Instant transactions were removed when “replace by fee” feature and increasing transaction waiting time in mempool from, I think 3 days to 14 days, were introduced. It was done to allegedly make it easier to estimate correct fee needed to pay to get to next block. In effect though, it enabled race to the top of the fees where in order to keep up with increasing volume, it was better to increase fee above everybody else or face staying in limbo of unconfirmed transaction for two weeks or more in case some party chooses to rebroadcast transaction. What is more terrifying, transactions couldn’t be safely used as instant anymore, as a sender could potentially double spend transaction with sending funds to different than original address with higher fee and more chance to not get rejected. Instant transaction was basically killed. Now we all had to wait for confirmations, preferably 6 of them. Originally, that was only advised as extra safety measure for bigger purchases, but now thanks to rbf, it is a must. Plus fees were encouraged to go up.
Foundations for high fees were set by rbf and 1mb block size. When volume came with increasing adoption and interest from new users, fees skyrocketed to above 1000sat/byte. You could send with lower fees and get lucky, but basically fees were extremely high. Also, not every transaction is simple. This 1000sat/byte could easily result in fee on 100gbp for transaction if you were using many unspent outputs.
That killed adoption. Period. You can’t use bitcoin to send money if you have to pay transaction bigger than often value of transaction itself. Low fee or no fee aspect was killed and even vanished for a while from bitcoin.org site.
Important part is, that all of that above could have been justified. As I mentioned before, bitcoin is not finished and it is vulnerable so any changes should be tested, not rushed. I can understand that. What is more, I can not demand from bitcoin developers changes. I can propose changes myself and even show how to do it though.
But here is the tricky part. Bitcoin core developers killed all progress by censoring every discussion that was not in line with central party rhetoric. You want to talk about big blocks? Ban. You want to ask about why not? Ban. But, but… Ban. So changes can not be proposed anymore and discussed. It was possible to get ban even when taking part in discussion elsewhere or agree to something core didn’t approve and “obviously” being not in line.
Well done guys, you just created central authority that stand against everything that bitcoin was for.
How big fees were justified?
By pushing blame on users. It must be stupid to use bitcoin they said. When you using it you are taking precious resources. You are bad for bitcoin. Bitcoin is not money, it is store of value!!!
Just buy and hold. Sorry. Just buy and “hodl”. Be stupid meme reader. Than tell others to buy and hold. Create perfect ponzi. This is what bitcoin core is now being used mostly for.
Solutions proposed and introduced.
Segwit or Segregated Witness. (didn’t help)
Reorganisation of transaction record that changes the way transaction size is being counted and also fixes malleability issue. At the time of introduction it was being compared to approximately equal to increase to 1.7 mb block size. Now opinions and calculations are vary. Some give it more, but most are very confusing anyway. As misinformation is very common in bitcoin world, I leave it for everybody to check it themselves.
Segwit was mostly needed to introduce Lightning Network that required transaction malleability to be fixed. In normal bitcoin use, it wasn’t really big problem, but lightning apparently had to have it sorted this way.
Lightning network
Fascinating concept really I must admit. It is different layer working on top of bitcoin block chain. Instead of sending every transaction on chain, users were encouraged to use this so called settlement layer, where only final balancing is written on chain. In theory, when network will be big enough and everybody will connect, closing final balances will never be required or for very long time plus when something goes wrong. Lightning network is in even bigger beta than I thought and I don’t think I can say more about its technical side, but already I think it might be very interesting someday. It should not stop on chain scaling though.
My problem with Lightning network is more on idealogical level. It to much looks like trying to replicate existing banking system (I might be totally wrong on this) and there was LIE spread before introducing LN that everybody needs to run full node. It is a lie. Obvious lie.
First of all, the definition of full node has been changed. Originally full node was node that was doing all functions of node and that includes mining. Mining is now highly centralised and it has very big entry price, so normal user rather can’t run full node efficiently.
Definition has changed to call non mining nodes a full node. That implies they are important to bitcoin network. They are not. They are important for Lightning network though, as user has to be connected to it all the time via they're own node.
Not only Lightning Network is build on bitcoin chain but also on the lie and misinformation. That is very bad. Any discussion to put things straight as they are result in ban in every communication channel controlled by central authority of core devs.
Every day I come to reddit or any other social media, I see plenty of lies, usually from people that do not lie, and I am sick of it. Bitcoin is evil, bitcoin is broken, bitcoin is taken over by malicious group, that luckily forked away in August last year and is marked as btc.
Bch chain restored the original value of Bitcoin. Central authority is gone. If it happens again, we will fork away again. It is low fee or no fee system for everybody.
It is fascinating again. There is new development. Look on memo and blockpress. If you can’t see implications of this, I don’t know what to say.
Now is the time people have to choose though. Bitcoin cash has low volume. It is possible people don’t want uncensored money, social network, or network in general. Maybe they need Lambo dream and ponzi scheme? Maybe. I don’t know. But I’m off from btc and I am not coming back.
submitted by MarchewkaCzerwona to btc [link] [comments]

I'm a 45 year old with arthritis and I built an anonymous futures exchange (Gold, Crude Oil, Sports, etc.) in C#; All trades settle in Bitcoin; Site is very rough, needs some QA / testing

The site: https://www.bitfutures.co
TLDR: I work in the futures industry and thought it might be fun to build a simple, anonymous futures exchange that uses Bitcoin as a settlement mechanism instead of fiat. My ultimate goal is to discover some talented futures traders to whom my company (a financial firm in hedge fund space) can allocate trading capital.
For now I'm just looking for 2 or 3 guys to buy (or short) a couple of different futures contracts on my site and let me know how things work for you. Shoot me an email and let me know you're participating. I'll try to provide a bid/ask in your market of interest so you can execute a market order or alternatively, try placing a limit order and I'll trade with you.
-- ENHANCEMENTS FROM RECENT FEEDBACK --
-- WARNINGS --
-- CONTACT INFO --
site: https://www.bitfutures.co
Gale Boetticher email: [email protected] BitMessage: BM-2cXAXMG5KGBxt1pJUFPAEJq5cuFdwi53Pi
EDIT: Got rid of the confusing ".io" TLD for the site's domain name; now ".co";
submitted by gale_boetticher_9 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Someone please post the actual cost of a .1 coinjoin.

$500 is too much for me to just test it and find out. What was the amount of bitcoin received after say .1 btc and 1 btc coin join. Anything with "anonymity sets" or .03% time something is unhelpful as I don't understand how the transaction fees play out, whether this is calculated per round, etc... What was the amount returned to your wallet in the end. Also, have any of the unconfirmed or stuck or null reference errors here resulted in lost coins? I appreciate anyone who answers, I've just found too many "tricks" that cost me money online whenever I find something really useful. Also, what denominations come out. Do I pick or is it the same that went in?
submitted by sticker592 to WasabiWallet [link] [comments]

An in-depth overview of different mobile wallets

Disclaimer: A lot of time went into writing this and more research than I anticipated. Errors are not just possible, they are certain. If you find any mistakes, please reach out to me and I'll edit. Furthermore I know I probably missed a couple apps, there are a lot out there. If I missed a big one, then again contact me and I'll consider adding it. If you are reading this in the future, note that these apps update regularly, anything mentioned here may have changed by the time you are reading it.

What is a mobile wallet?

A mobile Bitcoin wallet is an application for a mobile device which acts as a lightweight wallet and allows you to store, send and receive Bitcoin (or other cryptocurrencies and tokens). Mobile wallets use SPV (Simplified Payment Verification) to allow wallet functionality without having to download the whole blockchain. This is very important as barely any mobile phones have enough storage space required for the full blockchain. Mobile wallets are also considered hotwallets, meaning they have an active connection to the internet. The mere fact of being 'online' allows for a number of attack vectors and as such should never be used to store large amounts. It is however not unsafe per se. Private keys are stored locally and encrypted. Some wallets keep backups of those encrypted private keys on a server of their own, and this is something to take note of, but not to fear. So without further ado, lets get to it. I focused on Android wallets, but many of the wallets mentioned here have iOS versions.

Quick overview

Name Segwit Multisig Backup Other coins Fee Choice Privacy Options Depth/Complexity
Samourai Yes No 12 word seed + passphrase No Custom A ton Advanced
Bread No No 12 word seed No 2 Options No Beginner
GreenAddress Yes Yes 24 word seed No Custom Tor Optional Intermediate
AirBitz No No Private seed No Custom-ish No Beginner
Electrum Yes Yes 12 word seed No Custom Proxy possible Intermediate
Copay No Yes 12 word seed No Custom No Beginner
ArcBit No No 12 word seed No Fixed or Dynamic No Beginner
CoinSpace No No 12 word seed BCH/LTC/ETH 3 Options No Intermediate
Simple Bitcoin No No 12 word seed No None No Beginner
Bither No No 12 word seed BCH/BCG 4 choices No Intermediate
GreenBits Yes No 24 word seed No Custom No Beginner
Jaxx No No 12 word seed A ton 3 options No Advanced
Xapo / / / / / Public /
Coinomi No No 18 word seed A ton Custom No Advanced
Mycelium No No 12 word seed No Scrollwheel Tor Optional Intermediate

Wallet Breakdown

Samourai

Samourai focusses heavily on anonymity and obfuscation. Addresses are never used more than once. When making a transaction there is an obfuscation slider. Samourai has had SegWit enabled since October. Furthermore it offers a plethora of different features, too much to sum up here. If you are an advanced crypto-user you should definitely check out this wallet and their website which explains all of the different features. The UI takes a bit of getting used to though.

Breadwallet

Breadwallet is a very simple to use, straightforward app. The UI is slick and intuitive and in-app support to basic questions is very well incorporated. This could be a good wallet for a new person to the scene. The lack of advanced features will make this app not the go-to for more experienced users. It does however feature fingerprint authentication, which is cool, as well as BCH extraction. The lack of SegWit and complete absence of custom fee's is a problem though, especially since fees have gone up during the recent BTC spike. With only 2 fee options to choose from I simply can not recommend this wallet to people who are looking to make frequent transactions.

GreenAddress

When I first started with Greenaddress I didn't like the UI, I found it a bit clumsy. So definitely not user-friendly for a beginner. On the plus side it allows a choice of 2FA settings. Furthermore it has SegWit enabled and it has some advanced features like nLockTime transactions and it offers a service for instant transactions. This all feels very Lightning Network-y, which makes sense as GreenAddress is a part of Blockstream. Our friends in the other sub will most likely have something to say about this. I'll refrain from this and just say the following: this is an advanced wallet with promising features. If they clean up their UI a bit I could see myself using this without hesitation. The fact that they have MultiSig is a big plus as most mobile wallets do not have this functionality.

AirBitz

Unlike any other wallet I fired up at that point, this app did not prompt me with a 12- or 24-word seed. Instead it made me make an account, the regular username/password combo. After some research I found that these are not stored in a local database on their end. Which means that recovering your password in case of loss like with every other username/password login method we are so used to, is not possible. It is merely a different representation of an encryption key, allowing you access to your private keys. It features some interesting stuff though, NFC-compliant transactions and Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) for example. Clearly this app is meant to be a bridge between users and merchants and has focus on making regular in-person transactions. Thus it mimics some non-crypto related payment apps that we have. Personally, I am not a fan, but I can appreciate the design philosophy and I would't be surprised if their design model worked very well in the future with the LN or with other crypto's that focus on small payments. As for the UI, it's fairly simple, yet horribly cluttered with partnered services. Good for non-techies maybe, but not for more experienced crypto-enthusiasts.

Electrum

Much like the desktop wallet I used years ago when I first started with Bitcoin, the mobile wallet is minimal. Straightforward and without fancy colors or UI. For those of us who have known the internet before Facebook, this app will feel strangely familiar. This is a classic example of a no-nonsense wallet with the features that really matter. SegWit and MultiSig enabled. A further lack of advanced options might be a turn-off for some users out there though. I did however find the option to spend coins from unconfirmed transactions. This could be very useful in case you want to cancel out a previously stuck or erroneous transaction and ensure it's never cleared. One downside to this wallet is the very primitive way of setting a custom fee. No guidelines, scrollwheel or info. Just a simple box in which to put your fee which won't help intermediate users, only experienced users.
Edit: sidenote on the SegWit implementation by Electrum http://www.crypto-economy.net/electrum-3-0-enables-bech32-segwit-addresses/?lang=en

CoPay

Of all the apps I've tried up to this point, CoPay had the best initializing phase, succinctly explaining risk and security. I can not imagine a better intro to a wallet for a first time bitcoiner. It being of a product of BitPay, of which I am personally not a fan, I have to admit though. This app looks clean, feels fast and is easy to use. It successfully demystified MultiSig functionality in its UI and partnered services are not obtrusive in the design. Downsides are lack of fee setting possibilities and SegWit. The latter I really do not understand given their main core of business. If it wasn't for those last two points, I would not see why not to recommend this wallet.

ArcBit

This app dissapointed me a bit. It starts out of the box, not mentioning any backup seeds or tutorial on the wallet itself or Bitcoin. It has no SegWit, no MultiSig, a lack of features and whilst a backup seed can still be requested from the settings, I feel it is of the utmost importance that such a security measure is not quickly overlooked. The lack of fee management tops it off. While this wallet works just fine and looks just fine, there are too many alternatives out there with better options and functionality for me to ever advise anyone to use this wallet.

CoinSpace

CoinSpace is one of those apps that could be really cool, but completely missed the boat on some other design choices. In-app ads unless you pay 1.6$ or something. Settings hidden behind a CoinSpace login screen. It features multiple tokens though with built in conversion through ShapeShift, which could have been awesome. But the excessive ads are just a big no-no. Lack of SegWit and limited fee options make this one of the least interesting wallets out there.

Simple Bitcoin Wallet

Simple Bitcoin is a very basic, barebone wallet. Feels like a one-man project. Almost no settings possible at all. There's much better out there.

Bither

I oddly liked Bither because of its design that reminded me of websites from the 2005-ish era using lots of gradients. Its one of those apps that you either like or you don't. The UI is not bad, but could be better, there's some functionality hidden in the settings, but not enough to satisfy. One very useful feature is built in BCH and BCG extraction. This is the first app I encountered with built in Bitcoin Gold access. It also has a separate tab with just market price information, which is really useful for the price ticker addicts among us. Furthermore it features Cold/Hot Storage View which allows you to monitor cold storage and with a nice graph shows you the distribution between Hot and Cold. Cool stuff. I would suggest to check it out, I'm sure some people will like and some won't. Do note, no SegWit. I would personally use this as a view-wallet only. Not as a spending wallet.

GreenBits

GreenBits is like the light version of GreenAddress. I tried looking for why one team would make 2 wallets but could not find a definitive answer asides from GreenBits being Android-native. And while some resources state MultiSig functionality and Tor through Orbot, I couldn't find those in this app. It does however sport SegWit and custom fees like GreenAddress. On the UI front I feel much more comfortable with this app though and I could see it being better received by average users. Looks like a good spending wallet without much extra.

Jaxx

Jaxx is a rather large wallet that supports many many many different coins with built in ShapeShift functionality. It did suffer from a hack earlier this year which is why this wallet has been discredited. I would however suggest looking into this one if you are invested in multiple different coins and regularly swap between them to get some financial edge. Lack of SegWit and fee options don't make this an ideal app for Bitcoin-only users.

Xapo

Xapo, known for its cold storage solutions was one of the apps I was eager to check out. Upon starting I however first had to verify through a text message, giving up my phone number, after which I was greeted by a 'Continue with Facebook or email' - screen. Upon choosing email, I was further asked to give up personal information. Nothing personal against these types of business models, but this is not what I am looking for in a mobile wallet. Centralization of personal information is quite in contrast with the decentralized and pseudonymous qualities of cryptocurrencies. This being the 13th wallet I've fired up tonight, I decided to give this one a pass.

Coinomi

Coinomi is very similar to Jaxx in the way that it supports a crapload of different currencies and in-app conversions between different tokens through ShapeShift and additionally Changelly. It does look quite a bit more straightforward though. A good alternative to Jaxx for those multicrypto traders among us. Unfortunately yet again not the best for straight Bitcoiners due to lack of SegWit. It has custom fees though, but much like Electrum, there's no real help here and it's just a manual input.

Mycelium

Mycelium has been my wallet app for a couple years now. Unfortunately the delay in SegWit adoption has me looking elsewhere and in succession writing this article. I really liked the recent addition of the fee scrollwheel, which is still the most detailed and succesful implementation of custom fees in any app I've seen. Having tried out many other apps at this point I can now see Mycelium, while not particulary user-unfriendly, could still very much improve its UI. It is however not a bad wallet, never crashed on me, always ran smooth through multiple updates. But let's not get sentimental here, it's a solid app, but its time for me and maybe you as well to try out something different ;-)

Conclusion

In this excruciatingly long article I've ran through a couple different wallet apps. One thing to learn is that not a single one of these is perfect and there's still room for improvement on many fronts. Which wallet holds your preference today depends largely on what you are looking for in a wallet. Do you want the cheapest transactions, then go for one of the SegWit enabled wallets. Do you like cool functionality, then check out Bither. Is anonymity of a concern to you then Samourai looks like the clear winner. More into multiple coins at once, then Coinomi or Jaxx is the way to go. And this is mobile wallets only, you have your desktop wallets, hardware wallets, cold storage solutions, paper wallets. But I'm all out of ink tonight!
I can't give you specific advice. In this world of cryptocurrencies we are in control of our own money. Being in control of your own money means being responsible for its security too. So make your own decision and due diligence.
Edit: Thanks everyone for the awesome responses. I've had some requests to further mention some important information regarding the wallets. I will write these down here as a memo to myself in the future, at which point I will review the state of mobile apps in greater detail once again. - Open Source or not - iOS version or not - Adding iOS only wallet apps
submitted by Zyntra to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

r/Bitcoin recap - February 2018

Hi Bitcoiners!
I’m back with the fourteenth monthly Bitcoin news recap.
For those unfamiliar, each day I pick out the most popularelevant/interesting stories in Bitcoin and save them. At the end of the month I release them in one batch, to give you a quick (but not necessarily the best) overview of what happened in bitcoin over the past month.
You can see recaps of the previous months on Bitcoinsnippets.com
A recap of Bitcoin in February 2018
submitted by SamWouters to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Unmasking the Blockstream Business Plan

Background

sidechains
Sidechains are secondary two-way "pegged" blockchains that are interoperable with the bitcoin blockchain, which allow assets to be transferred between chains and not be confined to the bitcoin blockchain policies.
Lightning Network (LN)
LN is a "caching layer" for Bitcoin, creating off-chain payment channels using a new sighash opcode which allows the Bitcoin network to scale transactions to billions of transactions which can be processed nearly instantly.

Motivation

In order for sidechains to work and for Blockstream to be successful, Blockstream needs to artificially keep the Bitcoin blockchain at a low capacity (max_block_size = 1MB), so that they can push users off of the Bitcoin blockchain onto a sidechain where assets (transactions, contracts, etc.) can happen. By doing this, they are forcibly (see "protocol wars") able to create an environment where their solution is more desirable, creating a second premium tiered layer. The Bitcoin blockchain will end up being for "regular" users and sidechains will be for premium users that will pay to have their assets moved with speed, consistency, and feasibility.
"While such cryptographic transfer of value is near-instantaneous, ensuring that the transaction has been included in the consensus of the shared ledger (aka. blockchain) creates delays ranging from a few minutes to hours, depending on the level of reliability required. Inclusion in the blockchain is performed by miners, who preferentially include transactions paying greatest fee per byte. Thus using the blockchain directly is slow, and too expensive for genuinely small transfers (typical fees are a few cents)." - Source
By introducing Segregated Witness (SW), Blockstream has been able to pretend to care about increasing the Bitcoin block size, when in reality, they have no desire to increase it at all. The real reason for SW is to fix tx-malleability which is a requirement to get LN to work. SW being able to increase throughput up to 1.75MB is just a byproduct and not a scaling solution. In addition, SW allows creation of unconfirmed transaction dependency chains without counterparty risk, an important feature for off-chain protocols such as LN.
Blockstream is also able to artificially create a fee market through different mechanisms (RBF) which creates a volatile experience for users on the Bitcoin blockchain. Merchants can no longer trust zero-confirmation tx’s, and users will have to fight with others by prioritizing their tx’s with higher fees to get their tx’s confirmed in the mempool before they are dropped. Creating a fee market on the Bitcoin blockchain is another incentive to push users off-chain to their second tier platform with premium scalability and ease-of-use, where zero-confirmations can be trusted again.

Putting it together

As you can see from Blockstream’s motivations and past history, it’s become very clear to the entire Bitcoin community that their intentions are to sabotage Bitcoin in order to make sidechains the go-to platform for anyone in the world to be able to transfer assets on the blockchain with speed and scalability. They have never intended on raising the block size, do not plan on it, and are creating a volatile ecosystem so they can sell their premium second tier platform to users through control and censorship.

Revenue Model

This is an update/edit as it has recently come to light from Blockstream executive Greg Maxwell that Blockstream plans to privatize sidechains through the limiting of the Bitcoin blockchain and generate revenue through subscriptions, transaction fees, support (consulting), and custom development work. Their first client as it turns out is major bank and financial firm, PWC.

References:

Edit:
To the Core dev who is harassing me over PM, I have reported you to the reddit admins.
Edit:
A redditor who wanted to remain anonymous asked me to also include this information which seems just as important and relevant to the plan:
Concerning SegWit, it would also be necessary to mention that it not just fixes tx malleability, but also makes opening and closing Lightning channels cheaper.
Lightning will use very complex scripts, so the transaction size for creating a channel will take like 2-5x more space than an ordinary transaction, resulting in an increased transaction fee. With SegWit deployed, the scripts are removed from the blocks, so the fees for ordinary tx and opening a channel will be the same.
Edit:
To those that have gifted me gold, thank you!
submitted by Gobitcoin to btc [link] [comments]

How many cryptocurrencies have real world acceptance of their coin?

New York Coin (NYC) launched on March 6th, 2014. Original developer disappeared at launch and is still unknown to this date. NYC is a fair launch cryptocurrency with no pre-mine. NYC is completely open-source code with searchable block explorers. NYC enables a free worldwide network with lightning fast transactions. A worldwide group of dedicated miners have kept the NYC network confirming transactions every 30 seconds for the past 4+ years. In January 2018, NYC finally got noticed. A worldwide, decentralized group of developers joined the NYC Community and began updating the aging code, nodes and wallets. NYC has begun attracting high-caliber tech talent from Fortune 100 Companies recently. After nearly 4 years of stagnant development, the NYC Devs have completed core wallet updates, updated nodes, developed Electrum NYC wallets and are currently in the process of implementing a fork to update network security (protect against 51% attacks) and begin block reward halving. The future is bright for NYC. NYC is a basic money transfer system. No frills, no whitepaper, just the basics that Bitcoin and Litecoin offer. Worldwide, anonymous transfer of funds. NYC just does it faster and does it cheaper. NYC is lightning fast - test it! Unconfirmed transactions worldwide in 1-2 seconds. Confirmations every 30 seconds since 2014. And there are no fees to send funds. Zero fees. NYC offers FREE, lightning-fast worldwide money transfer. NYC is actually usable at the retail level. Bitcoin is not feasible for time-sensitive daily consumer purchases. NYC is simply a more usable version of Bitcoin. MEET NYC "the best kept secret in crypto". NYC is now accepted at 28 businesses worldwide (and growing weekly). TINY MARKET CAP #500 on Coinmarketcap.
submitted by hivewalletvictim to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

So can anyone explain to me...

What do you use bitcoin for?
I mean this in the most fundamental and basic of senses.
Is it a method of payment? If so, then what for specifically?
Coffees at a local store? Really though.
So far I've not noticed any vast proliferation of payment locations, and even so I'd rather just use a debit card or cash because I always know the value of that. If bitcoin fluctuates 25% in 1 hour then how do I know at my local hipster coffee shop, what am I paying for this latté? Also, what fee am I paying? Visa charges a pretty reliable 25bps at all times and it is guaranteed to always go through.
If there's a 220k unconfirmed transaction count at any given time, then these transactions aren't "real" even in the blockchain sense.
Steam for instance has dropped support for these very reasons. One of the early cheerleaders.
So if you cannot reliably pay for anything with this "currency", it is not really a currency.
And to the point that it's deflationary because there can only be 21mln at the end of the day. If so , then why are there almost 2,000 cryptos in existence? Doesn't really seem like scarcity if there is an arbitrary number of variants.
Now moving to the issue of "easy transferibility". If if's so great to transfer BTC easily and anonymously to my grandfather, fine. But what does he use it for? Transferring to other people?
Somewhere down the chain someone has to use it for something. And if no one can , then it seems to me just a perpetual game of hot potato.
Take a step back and think about the raw, basic, fundamental value of this thing. And to me it seems to be worth $0.
submitted by LOSEALLYOURMONEY to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Transaction malleability, why is this such a big problem that so many feel they must fix?

The transaction still completes just fine and is only a problem with unconfirmed transactions.
Doesn't this allow us to actually disconnect the visibility of transaction history while still completing the transaction?
Wouldn't that actually improve Bitcoin's pseudo-anonymous feature?
I am trying to figure out why there is such a concerted effort to "fix" this when it is a non-problem and only affects unconfirmed transactions
submitted by DaSpawn to btc [link] [comments]

BACK TO BASICS AND MAKE A FIST TOGETHER NOW!

I just read this article again that Jihan Wu posted on his twitter: https://keepingstock.net/an-open-letter-to-bitcoin-miners-c260467e1f0
It is very clear that the Bitcoin is being highjacked under our noses by the most powerful people in the world - the financial backers of Blockstream/Core -
But even worse about 90% of all people engaged in crypto and bitcoin, on twitter and definitely in any form of Media seem to be COMPLETELY ON THEIR SIDE... from newbies to developers with authority to regular smart people and journalists... It seems everyone is OK with the fact that the Elite is stealing the BTC promise from the world...
This is terrible.... really beyond terrible... Like the useful idiots of Lenin they sweep across the internet and shout us down... repeating the lie until it becomes truth and we are the ''bad people'' hurting bitcoin... with our Satoshi bigger block solution to scaling...
It is absolutely toxic what is going on... I have barely words to describe how this could have let to rot for so long....
It seems to me also that the smart older generation bitcoiners on our side are losing their voice and influence completely in the sphere... we are outnumbered and losing terribly..
Now we have this hard fork which is cleverly orchestrated but still it is not at all convincing anyone except for us that this is a good thing... it is being shunned and demonised through the internet MSM - so to speak...
Talking heads on youtube praise Segwit like it is Jesus himself... and once again are burning ''Bcash'' down where they can....
This is an open call to whoever that has the power to start taking the gloves off... Core/ Blockstream needs to be destroyed, whatever it takes...
All the EDA , death spirals and miners this and that aside... we dont know if Bitcoin Cash can make it to mainstream adoption... at this point it seems 99% of btc holders will make peace with centralised transaction infrastructure, sick tx fees and unconfirmed tx's as long as they stay part of the horde , and the btc price keeps rising...
We are losing and losing hard, and have no leadership, no infrastructure... we have nothing but EDA talk and some anonymous Chinese forces...
Jihan if you read this... start talking Man!! Destroy them all!!! pull the trigger, do everything and anything because if we dont act, Bitcoin will be forever Goldman Sachs Coin... and it might be valuable - even a million usd per coin - but we will lose the entire concept of ''Peer to peer electronic cash, globally adopted and decentralised'' forever...
and the useful idiots will feel like victors while they are actively shackling humanity with Banker coin...
P.S. If you have any sympathy towards this message please make the effort to share and post this directly to Jihan and Roger Ver ( the only two names I can come up with that might be able to save Bitcoin on the global scale)... Please!!! This is your responsibility... spread this message to them... We must act now or we are the joke that lasted a month and Bitcoin will be lost
submitted by AnthonyBanks to btc [link] [comments]

I'd like to hear why Bitcoin is a good currency. I'll tell you why it's not.

Bitcoin can't support more than a few transactions a second, since yesterday's sell off we see 72,000 unconfirmed transactions, yet people are yelling "just begun"? That wasn't even a real correction. Just micro-panic. safe to say it's not SCALABLE.
Miners turned down segwit2x, so called a "direct attack on the network" but things like that are the only thing that will allow update of blockchain size.
The majority (60%) of Bitcoin hashing power is controlled by less than 6 pools, safe to say that's CENTRALIZED. There is other protocols and forms of consensus which are truly decentralized.
The blockchain is public, safe to say it's not ANONYMOUS. Things like Monero and Zcash are anonymous.
Cost per transaction exceeds $60 USD, safe to say it's not a viable CURRENCY. Things like Litecoin and Ripple are much better, quicker and cheaper.
Average confirmation time takes 15 minutes and requires multiple (3+) for a transaction to clear.
Things like this will continue to happen: https://www.cryptocoinsnews.com/700-million-stuck-115000-unconfirmed-bitcoin-transactions/
Sure, it can keep going up, but that really doesn't mean it is a good currency. At this point people are buying because of speculation that they will make money and It is a good investment, while 90% do not know what is going on. This just makes it more and more likely we will see a sell-off to the median trend line and maybe even the death of the currency as a whole.
Early this November, Bitcoin Legacy devs said they were abandoning the project.
Around that time majority of miners swapped to BCH once it became more profitable and we saw over 175k unconfirmed transactions FROZEN. It does not matter if you have MILLIONS in it, if they hadn't decided to switch back that money is stuck in mempool for a very long time, possibly forever if they never went back.
2 weeks later and it's like it never happened...
I've been in this sector since 2013, and recently all I see is a bunch of kiddies buying into the latest new "hot" thing, without understanding the underlying technology or how it's underdeveloped, just because everyone else is, because they see it on the news, and because they think it's going to go up to the "moon" and get them that "lambo", the last part displaying the same values that keep the majority of the world in the middle class.
It is nothing less than idiotic and all I see is the delusion.
And for those of you who think Bitcoin is a good investment, just know it's the highest risk investment and has been outperformed by altcoin's like BCH, XMR, DASH, and many other altcoin's that are the best in their sector.
Bitcoin will take a 100x multiplier to reach one million.
I've already seen those returns in a lot of altcoins, this year and even the past few months.
For those of you who are bullish on bitcoin, let me hear it. Concrete arguments, not what you think or feel.
Something realistic, data-backed.
You know, like what I provided.
I'm bullish on cryptocurrencies but pretty bearish on Bitcoin.
I hope not to hear silence after seeing 90% of people who hear of it praise it like a new paradigm or religion, that would be the true answer to most of this, even though the proof is in the pudding, all data is public and much more accurate than John, thinking he'll retire early because he thinks he got an early ticket to the train.
I am not spreading FUD, this is all data-backed and realistic "argument".
submitted by banksnsons to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

An in-depth overview of 15 different mobile Bitcoin wallets

Disclaimer: A lot of time went into writing this and more research than I anticipated. Errors are not just possible, they are certain. If you find any mistakes, please reach out to me and I'll edit. Furthermore I know I probably missed a couple apps, there are a lot out there. If I missed a big one, then again contact me and I'll consider adding it. If you are reading this in the future, note that these apps update regularly, anything mentioned here may have changed by the time you are reading it.

What is a mobile wallet?

A mobile Bitcoin wallet is an application for a mobile device which acts as a lightweight wallet and allows you to store, send and receive Bitcoin (or other cryptocurrencies and tokens). Mobile wallets use SPV (Simplified Payment Verification) to allow wallet functionality without having to download the whole blockchain. This is very important as barely any mobile phones have enough storage space required for the full blockchain. Mobile wallets are also considered hotwallets, meaning they have an active connection to the internet. The mere fact of being 'online' allows for a number of attack vectors and as such should never be used to store large amounts. It is however not unsafe per se. Private keys are stored locally and encrypted. Some wallets keep backups of those encrypted private keys on a server of their own, and this is something to take note of, but not to fear. So without further ado, lets get to it. I focused on Android wallets, but many of the wallets mentioned here have iOS versions.

Quick overview

Name Segwit Multisig Backup Other coins Fee Choice Privacy Options Depth/Complexity
Samourai Yes No 12 word seed + passphrase No Custom A ton Advanced
Bread No No 12 word seed No 2 Options No Beginner
GreenAddress Yes Yes 24 word seed No Custom Tor Optional Intermediate
AirBitz No No Private seed No Custom-ish No Beginner
Electrum Yes Yes 12 word seed No Custom Proxy possible Intermediate
Copay No Yes 12 word seed No Custom No Beginner
ArcBit No No 12 word seed No Fixed or Dynamic No Beginner
CoinSpace No No 12 word seed BCH/LTC/ETH 3 Options No Intermediate
Simple Bitcoin No No 12 word seed No None No Beginner
Bither No No 12 word seed BCH/BCG 4 choices No Intermediate
GreenBits Yes No 24 word seed No Custom No Beginner
Jaxx No No 12 word seed A ton 3 options No Advanced
Xapo / / / / / Public /
Coinomi No No 18 word seed A ton Custom No Advanced
Mycelium No No 12 word seed No Scrollwheel Tor Optional Intermediate

Wallet Breakdown

Samourai

Samourai focusses heavily on anonymity and obfuscation. Addresses are never used more than once. When making a transaction there is an obfuscation slider. Samourai has had SegWit enabled since October. Furthermore it offers a plethora of different features, too much to sum up here. If you are an advanced crypto-user you should definitely check out this wallet and their website which explains all of the different features. The UI takes a bit of getting used to though.

Breadwallet

Breadwallet is a very simple to use, straightforward app. The UI is slick and intuitive and in-app support to basic questions is very well incorporated. This could be a good wallet for a new person to the scene. The lack of advanced features will make this app not the go-to for more experienced users. It does however feature fingerprint authentication, which is cool, as well as BCH extraction. The lack if SegWit and complete absence of custom fee's is a problem though, especially since fees have gone up during the recent BTC spike. With only 2 fee options to choose from I simply can not recommend this wallet to people who are looking to make frequent transactions.

GreenAddress

When I first started with Greenaddress I didn't like the UI, I found it a bit clumsy. So definitely not user-friendly for a beginner. On the plus side it allows a choice of 2FA settings. Furthermore it has SegWit enabled and it has some advanced features like nLockTime transactions and it offers a service for instant transactions. This all feels very Lightning Network-y, which makes sense as GreenAddress is a part of Blockstream. Our friends in the other sub will most likely have something to say about this. I'll refrain from this and just say the following: this is an advanced wallet with promising features. If they clean up their UI a bit I could see myself using this without hesitation. The fact that they have MultiSig is a big plus as most mobile wallets do not have this functionality.

AirBitz

Unlike any other wallet I fired up at that point, this app did not prompt me with a 12- or 24-word seed. Instead it made me make an account, the regular username/password combo. After some research I found that these are not stored in a local database on their end. Which means that recovering your password in case of loss like with every other username/password login method we are so used to, is not possible. It is merely a different representation of an encryption key, allowing you access to your private keys. It features some interesting stuff though, NFC-compliant transactions and Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) for example. Clearly this app is meant to be a bridge between users and merchants and has focus on making regular in-person transactions. Thus it mimics some non-crypto related payment apps that we have. Personally, I am not a fan, but I can appreciate the design philosophy and I would't be surprised if their design model worked very well in the future with the LN or with other crypto's that focus on small payments. As for the UI, it's fairly simple, yet horribly cluttered with partnered services. Good for non-techies maybe, but not for more experienced crypto-enthusiasts.

Electrum

Much like the desktop wallet I used years ago when I first started with Bitcoin, the mobile wallet is minimal. Straightforward and without fancy colors or UI. For those of us who have known the internet before Facebook, this app will feel strangely familiar. This is a classic example of a no-nonsense wallet with the features that really matter. SegWit and MultiSig enabled. A further lack of advanced options might be a turn-off for some users out there though. I did however find the option to spend coins from unconfirmed transactions. This could be very useful in case you want to cancel out a previously stuck or erroneous transaction and ensure it's never cleared. One downside to this wallet is the very primitive way of setting a custom fee. No guidelines, scrollwheel or info. Just a simple box in which to put your fee which won't help intermediate users, only experienced users.

CoPay

Of all the apps I've tried up to this point, CoPay had the best initializing phase, succinctly explaining risk and security. I can not imagine a better intro to a wallet for a first time bitcoiner. It being of a product of BitPay, of which I am personally not a fan, I have to admit though. This app looks clean, feels fast and is easy to use. It successfully demystified MultiSig functionality in its UI and partnered services are not obtrusive in the design. Downsides are lack of fee setting possibilities and SegWit. The latter I really do not understand given their main core of business. If it wasn't for those last two points, I would not see why not to recommend this wallet.

ArcBit

This app dissapointed me a bit. It starts out of the box, not mentioning any backup seeds or tutorial on the wallet itself or Bitcoin. It has no SegWit, no MultiSig, a lack of features and whilst a backup seed can still be requested from the settings, I feel it is of the utmost importance that such a security measure is not quickly overlooked. The lack of fee management tops it off. While this wallet works just fine and looks just fine, there are too many alternatives out there with better options and functionality for me to ever advise anyone to use this wallet.

CoinSpace

CoinSpace is one of those apps that could be really cool, but completely missed the boat on some other design choices. In-app ads unless you pay 1.6$ or something. Settings hidden behind a CoinSpace login screen. It features multiple tokens though with built in conversion through ShapeShift, which could have been awesome. But the excessive ads are just a big no-no. Lack of SegWit and limited fee options make this one of the least interesting wallets out there.

Simple Bitcoin Wallet

Simple Bitcoin is a very basic, barebone wallet. Feels like a one-man project. Almost no settings possible at all. There's much better out there.

Bither

I oddly liked Bither because of its design that reminded me of websites from the 2005-ish era using lots of gradients. Its one of those apps that you either like or you don't. The UI is not bad, but could be better, there's some functionality hidden in the settings, but not enough to satisfy. One very useful feature is built in BCH and BCG extraction. This is the first app I encountered with built in Bitcoin Gold access. It also has a separate tab with just market price information, which is really useful for the price ticker addicts among us. Furthermore it features Cold/Hot Storage View which allows you to monitor cold storage and with a nice graph shows you the distribution between Hot and Cold. Cool stuff. I would suggest to check it out, I'm sure some people will like and some won't. Do note, no SegWit. I would personally use this as a view-wallet only. Not as a spending wallet.

GreenBits

GreenBits is like the light version of GreenAddress. I tried looking for why one team would make 2 wallets but could not find a definitive answer asides from GreenBits being Android-native. And while some resources state MultiSig functionality and Tor through Orbot, I couldn't find those in this app. It does however sport SegWit and custom fees like GreenAddress. On the UI front I feel much more comfortable with this app though and I could see it being better received by average users. Looks like a good spending wallet without much extra.

Jaxx

Jaxx is a rather large wallet that supports many many many different coins with built in ShapeShift functionality. It did suffer from a hack earlier this year which is why this wallet has been discredited. I would however suggest looking into this one if you are invested in multiple different coins and regularly swap between them to get some financial edge. Lack of SegWit and fee options don't make this an ideal app for Bitcoin-only users.

Xapo

Xapo, known for its cold storage solutions was one of the apps I was eager to check out. Upon starting I however first had to verify through a text message, giving up my phone number, after which I was greeted by a 'Continue with Facebook or email' - screen. Upon choosing email, I was further asked to give up personal information. Nothing personal against these types of business models, but this is not what I am looking for in a mobile wallet. Centralization of personal information is quite in contrast with the decentralized and pseudonymous qualities of cryptocurrencies. This being the 13th wallet I've fired up tonight, I decided to give this one a pass.

Coinomi

Coinomi is very similar to Jaxx in the way that it supports a crapload of different currencies and in-app conversions between different tokens through ShapeShift and additionally Changelly. It does look quite a bit more straightforward though. A good alternative to Jaxx for those multicrypto traders among us. Unfortunately yet again not the best for straight Bitcoiners due to lack of SegWit. It has custom fees though, but much like Electrum, there's no real help here and it's just a manual input.

Mycelium

Mycelium has been my wallet app for a couple years now. Unfortunately the delay in SegWit adoption has me looking elsewhere and in succession writing this article. I really liked the recent addition of the fee scrollwheel, which is still the most detailed and succesful implementation of custom fees in any app I've seen. Having tried out many other apps at this point I can now see Mycelium, while not particulary user-unfriendly, could still very much improve its UI. It is however not a bad wallet, never crashed on me, always ran smooth through multiple updates. But let's not get sentimental here, it's a solid app, but its time for me and maybe you as well to try out something different ;-)

Conclusion

In this excruciatingly long article I've ran through a couple different wallet apps. One thing to learn is that not a single one of these is perfect and there's still room for improvement on many fronts. Which wallet holds your preference today depends largely on what you are looking for in a wallet. Do you want the cheapest transactions, then go for one of the SegWit enabled wallets. Do you like cool functionality, then check out Bither. Is anonymity of a concern to you then Samourai looks like the clear winner. More into multiple coins at once, then Coinomi or Jaxx is the way to go. And this is mobile wallets only, you have your desktop wallets, hardware wallets, cold storage solutions, paper wallets. But I'm all out of ink tonight!
I can't give you specific advise. In this world of cryptocurrencies we are in control of our own money. Being in control of your own money means being responsible for its security too. So make your own decision and due diligence.
Edit: Thanks everyone for the awesome responses. I've had some requests to further mention some important information regarding the wallets. I will write these down here as a memo to myself in the future, at which point I will review the state of mobile apps in greater detail once again. - Open Source or not - iOS version or not - Adding iOS only wallet apps
submitted by Zyntra to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Great interview questions for bitcoin engineers

From here...
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5006583.0
Questions. Chapter 1: Introduction 1. What are the main Bitcoin terms? 2. What is a Bitcoin address? 3. What is a Bitcoin transaction? 4. What is a Bitcoin block? 5. What is a Bitcoin blockchain? 6. What is a Bitcoin transaction ledger? 7. What is a Bitcoin system? What is a bitcoin (cryptocurrency)? How are they different? 8. What is a full Bitcoin stack? 9. What are two types of issues that digital money have to address? 10. What is a “double-spend” problem? 11. What is a distributed computing problem? What is the other name of this problem? 12. What is an election? 13. What is a consensus? 14. What is the name of the main algorithm that brings the bitcoin network to the consensus? 15. What are the different types of bitcoin clients? What is the difference between these clients? Which client offers the most flexibility? Which client offers the least flexibility? Which client is the most and least secure? 16. What is a bitcoin wallet? 17. What is a confirmed transaction and what is an unconfirmed transaction? Chapter 2: How Bitcoin works. 1. What is the best way to understand transactions in the Bitcoin network? 2. What is a transaction? What does it contain? What is the similarity of a transaction to a double entry ledger? What does input correspond to? What does output correspond to? 3. What are the typical transactions in the bitcoin network? Could you please name three of such transactions and give examples of each type of the transaction? 4. What is a QR and how it is used in the Bitcoin network? Are there different types of QRs? If so, what are the different types? Which type is more informational? What kind of information does it provide? 5. What is SPV? What does this procedure check and what type of clients of the Bitcoin network usually use this procedure? Chapter 3: The Bitcoin client. 1. How to download and install the Core Bitcoin client? 2. What is the best way to test the API available for the Core Bitcoin client without actually programming? What is the interface called? 3. What are the major areas of operations in the Bitcoin client? What can we do with the client? 4. What are the available operations for the Bitcoin addresses? 5. What are the available read operations for the Bitcoin transactions? How is a transaction encoded in the Bitcoin network? What is a raw transaction and what is a decoded transaction? 6. If I want to get information about a transaction that is not related to any address in my own wallet, do I need to change anything in the Bitcoin client configuration? If yes, which option do I need to modify? 7. What are the available read operation for the Bitcoin blocks? 8. What are the available operations for the creation of the transactions in the Bitcoin network? 9. How do you normally need to address the unspent output from the previous transaction in order to use it as an input for a new transaction? 10. What is the mandatory operation after creating a new transaction and before sending this new transaction to the network? What state does the wallet have to be in order to perform this operation? 11. Is the transaction ID immutable (TXID)? If not why, if yes, why and when? 12. What does signing a transaction mean? 13. What are the other options for Bitcoin clients? Are there any libraries that are written for some specific languages? What types of clients do these libraries implement? Chapter 4: Keys, Addresses and Wallets. 1. What is a PKC? When it was developed? What are the main mathematical foundations or functions that PKC is using? 2. What is ECC? Could you please provide the formula of the EC? What is the p and what is the Fp? What are the defined operations in ECC? What is a “point to infinity”? 3. What is a Bitcoin wallet? Does this wallet contain coins? If not, what does it contain then? 4. What is a BIP? What it is used for? 5. What is an encrypted private key? Why would we want to encrypt private keys? 6. What is a paper wallet? What kind of storage it is an example of? 7. What is a nondeterministic wallet? Is it a good wallet or a bad wallet? Could you justify? 8. What is a deterministic wallet? 9. What is an HD wallet? 10. How many keys are needed for one in and out transaction? What is a key pair? Which keys are in the key pair? 11. How many keys are stored in a wallet? 12. How does a public key gets created in Bitcoin? What is a “generator point”? 13. Could you please show on a picture how ECC multiplication is done? 14. How does a private key gets created in Bitcoin? What we should be aware of when creating a new private key? What is CSPRNG? What kind of input should this function be getting? 15. What is a WIF? What is WIF-Compressed? 16. What is Base58 encoding and what is Base58Check encoding? How it is different from Base64 encoding? Which characters are used in Base58? Why Base58Check was invented? What kind of problems does it solve? How is Base58Check encoding is created from Base58 encoding? 17. How can Bitcoin addresses be encoded? Which different encodings are used? Which key is used for the address creation? How is the address created? How this key is used and what is the used formula? 18. Can we visually distinguish between different keys in Base58Check format? If yes, how are they different from each other? What kind of prefixes are used? Could you please provide information about used prefixes for each type of the key? 19. What is an index in HD wallets? How many siblings can exist for a parent in an HD wallet? 20. What is the depth limitation for an HD wallet key hierarchy? 21. What are the main two advantages of an HD wallet comparing to the nondeterministic wallets? 22. What are the risks of non-hardened keys creation in an HD wallet? Could you please describe each of them? 23. What is a chain code in HD wallets? How many different chain code types there are? 24. What is the mnemonic code words? What are they used for? 25. What is a seed in an HD wallet? Is there any other name for it? 26. What is an extended key? How long is it and which parts does it consist of? 27. What is P2SH address? What function are P2SH addresses normally used for? Is that correct to call P2SH address a multi-sig address? Which BIP suggested using P2SH addresses? 28. What is a WIF-compressed private key? Is there such a thing as a compressed private key? Is there such a thing as a compressed public key? 29. What is a vanity address? 30. What is a vanity pool? 31. What is a P2PKH address? What is the prefix for the P2PKH address? 32. How does the owner prove that he is the real owner of some address? What does he have to represent to the network to prove the ownership? Why a perpetrator cannot copy this information and reuse it in the next transactions? 33. What is the rule for using funds that are secured by a cold storage wallet? How many times you can send to the address that is protected by the private key stored in a cold storage? How many times can you send funds from the address that is protected by the private key stored in a cold storage? Chapter 5: Transactions. 1. What is a transaction in Bitcoin? Why is it the most important operation in the Bitcoin ecosystem? 2. What is UTXO? What is one of the important rules of the UTXO? 3. Which language is used to write scripts in Bitcoin ecosystem? What are the features of this language? Which language does it look like? What are the limitations of this language? 4. What is the structure of a transaction? What does transaction consists of? 5. What are the standard transactions in Bitcoin? How many standard transactions there are (as of 2014)? 6. What is a “locking script” and what is an “unlocking script”? What is inside these scripts for a usual operation of P2PKH? What is a signature? Could you please describe in details how locking and unlocking scripts work and draw the necessary diagrams? 7. What is a transaction fee? What does the transaction fee depend on? 8. If you are manually creating transactions, what should you be very careful about? 9. Could you please provide a real life scenario when you might need a P2SH payment and operation? 10. What is the Script operation that is used to store in the blockchain some important data? Is it a good practice? Explain your answer. Chapter 6: The Bitcoin Network. 1. What is the network used in Bitcoin? What is it called? What is the abbreviation? What is the difference between this network architecture and the other network architectures? Could you please describe another network architecture and compare the Bitcoin network and the other network architectures? 2. What is a Bitcoin network? What is an extended Bitcoin network? What is the difference between those two networks? What are the other protocols used in the extended Bitcoin network? Why are these new protocols used? Can you give an example of one such protocol? What is it called? 3. What are the main functions of a bitcoin node? How many of them there are? Could you please name and describe each of them? Which functions are mandatory? 4. What is a full node in the Bitcoin network? What does it do and how does it differ from the other nodes? 5. What is a lightweight node in the Bitcoin network? What is another name of the lightweight node? How lightweight node checks transactions? 6. What are the main problems in the SPV process? What does SPV stand for? How does SPV work and what does it rely on? 7. What is a Sybil attack? 8. What is a transaction pool? Where are transaction pools stored in a Bitcoin network client? What are the two different transaction pools usually available in implementations? 9. What is the main Bitcoin client used in the network? What is the official name of the client and what is an unofficial name of this client? 10. What is UTXO pool? Do all clients keep this pool? Where is it stored? How does it differ from the transaction pools? 11. What is a Bloom filter? Why are Bloom filters used in the Bitcoin network? Were they originally used in the initial SW or were they introduced with a specific BIP? Chapter 7: The Blockchain. 1. What is a blockchain? 2. What is a block hash? Is it really a block hash or is it a hash of something else? 3. What is included in the block? What kind of information? 4. How many parents can one block have? 5. How many children can one block have? Is it a temporary or permanent state of the blockchain? What is the name of this state of the blockchain? 6. What is a Merkle tree? Why does Bitcoin network use Merkle trees? What is the advantage of using Merkle trees? What is the other name of the Merkle tree? What kind of form must this tree have? 7. How are blocks identified in the blockchain? What are the two commonly used identities? Are these identities stored in the blockchain? 8. What is the average size of one transaction? How many transactions are normally in one block? What is the size of a block header? 9. What kind of information do SPV nodes download? How much space do they save by that comparing to what they would need if they had to download the whole blockchain? 10. What is a usual representation of a blockchain? 11. What is a genesis block? Do clients download this block and if yes – where from? What is the number of the genesis block? 12. What is a Merkle root? What is a Merkle path? Chapter 8: Mining and Consensus. 1. What is the main purpose of mining? Is it to get the new coins for the miners? Alternatively, it is something else? Is mining the right or good term to describe the process? 2. What is PoW algorithm? 3. What are the two main incentives for miners to participate in the Bitcoin network? What is the current main incentive and will it be changed in the future? 4. Is the money supply in the Bitcoin network diminishing? If so, what is the diminishing rate? What was the original Bitcoin supply rate and how is it changed over time? Is the diminishing rate time related or rather block related? 5. What is the maximum number of Bitcoins available in the network after all the Bitcoins have been mined? When will all the Bitcoins be mined? 6. What is a decentralized consensus? What is a usual setup to clear transactions? What does a clearinghouse do? 7. What is deflationary money? Are they good or bad usually? What is the bad example of deflationary spiral? 8. What is an emergent consensus? What is the feature of emergent consensus? How does it differ from a usual consensus? What are the main processes out of which this emergent decentralized consensus becomes true? 9. Could you please describe the process of Independent Transaction Verification? What is the list of criteria that are checked against a newly received transaction? Where can these rules be checked? Can they be changed over time? If yes, why would they be changed? 10. Does mining node have to be a full node? If not, what are the other options for a node that is not full to be a mining node? 11. What is a candidate block? What types of nodes in the Bitcoin network create candidate blocks? What is a memory pool? Is there any other name of the memory pool? What are the transactions kept in this memory pool? 12. How are transactions added to the candidate block? How does a candidate block become a valid block? 13. What is the minimum value in the Bitcoin network? What is it called and what is the value? Are there any alternative names? 14. What is the age of the UTXO? 15. How is the priority of a transaction is calculated? What is the exact formula? What are the units of each contributing member? When is a transaction considered to be old? Can low priority transactions carry a zero fee? Will they be processed in this case? 16. How much size in each block is reserved for high priority transactions? How are transactions prioritized for the remaining space? 17. Do transactions expire in Bitcoin? Can transactions disappear in the Bitcoin network? If yes, could you please describe such scenario? 18. What is a generation transaction? Does it have another name? If it does, what is the other name of the transaction? What is the position of the generation transaction in the block? Does it have an input? Is the input usual UTXO? If not – what is the input called? How many outputs there are for the generation transaction? 19. What is the Coinbase data? What is it currently used for? 20. What is little-endian and big-endian formats? Could you please give an example of both? 21. How is the block header constructed? Which fields are calculated and added to the block header? Could you please describe the steps for calculation of the block header fields? 22. What is a mantissa-exponent encoding? How is this encoding used in the Bitcoin network? What is the difficulty target? What is the actual process of mining? What kind of mathematical calculation is executed to conduct mining? 23. Which hash function is used in the Bitcoin mining process? 24. Could you describe the PoW algorithm? What features of the hash function does it depend on? What is the other name of the hash function? What is a nonce? How can we increase the difficulty of the PoW calculation? What do we need to change and how do we need to change this parameter? 25. What is difficulty bits notation? Could you please describe in details how it works? What is the formula for the difficulty notation? 26. Why is difficulty adjustable? Who adjusts it and how exactly? Where is the adjustment made? On which node? How many blocks are taken into consideration to predict the next block issuance rate? What is the change limitation? Does the target difficulty depend on the number of transactions? 27. How is a new block propagated in the network? What kind of verification does each node do? What is the list of criteria for the new block? What kind of process ensures that the miners do not cheat? 28. How does a process of block assembly work? What are the sets of blocks each full node have? Could you please describe these sets of blocks? 29. What is a secondary chain? What does each node do to check this chain and perhaps to promote it to the primary chain? Could you please describe an example when a fork occurs and what happens? 30. How quickly forks are resolved most of the time? Within how many new block periods? 31. Why the next block is generated within 10 minutes from the previous? What is this compromise about? What do designers of the Bitcoin network thought about when implementing this rule? 32. What is a hashing race? How did Bitcoin hashing capacity has changed within years from inception? What kind of hardware devices were initially used and how did the HW utilization evolved? What kind of hardware is used now to do mining? How has the network difficulty improved? 33. What is the size of the field that stores nonce in the block header? What is the limitation and problem of the nonce? Why was an extra nonce created? Was there any intermediate solution? If yes, what was the solution? What are the limitations of the solution? 34. What is the exact solution for the extra nonce? Where does the new space come from? How much space is currently used and what is the range of the extra nonce now? 35. What is a mining pool? Why was it created? How are normally such pools operated? Do they pay regularly to the pool participants? Where are newly created Bitcoins distributed? To which address? How do mining pools make money? How do the mining pools calculate the participation? How are shares earned calculated? 36. What is a managed pool? How is the owner of the pool called? Do pool members need to run full nodes? Explain why or why not? 37. What are the most famous protocols used to coordinate pool activities? What is a block template? How is it used? 38. What is the limitation of a centralized pool? Is there any alternative? If yes, what is it? How is it called? How does it work? 39. What is a consensus attack? What is the main assumption of the Bitcoin network? What can be the targets of the consensus attacks? What can these attacks do and what they cannot do? How much overall capacity of the network do you have to control to exercise a consensus attack? Chapter 9: Alternative Chains, Currencies and Applications. 1. What is the name of alternative coins? Are they built on top of the Bitcoin network? What are examples of them? Is there any alternative approach? Could you please describe some alternatives? 2. Are there any alternatives to the PoW algorithm? If yes – what are the alternatives? Could you please name two or three? 3. What is the operation of the Script language that is used to store a metadata in Bitcoin blockchain? 4. What is a coloured coin? Could you please explain how it is created and how it works? Do you need any special SW to manage coloured coins? 5. What is the difference between alt coins and alt chains? What is a Litecoin? What are the major differences between the Bitcoin and Litecoin? Why so many alt coins have been created? What are they usually based on? 6. What is Scrypt? Where is it used and how is it different from the original algorithm from which it has been created? 7. What is a demurrage currency? Could you please give an example of one blockchain and crypto currency that is demurrage? 8. What is a good example of an alternative algorithm to PoW? What is it called and how is it different from the PoW? Why the alternatives to Bitcoin PoW have been created? What is the main reason for this? What is dual-purpose PoW algorithms? Why have they been created? 9. Is Bitcoin “anonymous” currency? Is it difficult to trace transactions and understand someone’s spending habits? 10. What is Ethereum? What kind of currency does it use? What is the difference from Bitcoin? Chapter 10: Bitcoin security. 1. What is the main approach of Bitcoin security? 2. What are two common mistakes made by newcomers to the world of Bitcoin? 3. What is a root of trust in traditional security settings? What is a root of trust in Bitcoin network? How should you assess security of your system? 4. What is a cold storage and paper wallet? 5. What is a hardware wallet? How is it better than storing private keys on your computer or your smart phone?
submitted by 5tu to BitcoinTechnology [link] [comments]

New York Times: Facebook Reportedly Shopping ‘Facebook Coin’ to Crypto Exchanges

Facebook is “hoping to succeed where Bitcoin failed” with its highly secretive cryptocurrency project, a New York Times (NYT) article published today, Feb. 28, argues.

Citing multiple anonymous sources who spoke on the condition of anonymity, the Times pieces together the alleged contours of the project, which will reportedly aim to integrate cryptocurrency payments into its messaging services.

Notably, Facebook plans to rehaul its messaging infrastructure and integrate its three wholly-owned apps — WhatsApp, Messenger and Instagram — under one canopy. As the Times notes, this would provide a future crypto token with exposure across the combined 2.7 billion who use the three services each month.

A crypto-powered payments system that would operate from within a messaging system, the Times notes, is an idea being hotly pursued by several global messaging giants, such as Korea’s Kakao, Line in Japan, and Russian-developed Telegram.

According to NYT, Facebook launched its crypto project — led by ex-PayPal president David Marcus — shortly after Telegram had sealed close to $1.7 billion in two private initial coin offering (ICO) rounds for its forthcoming token and blockchain platform Telegram Open Network (TON).

Facebook has reportedly employed over 50 engineers to develop its cryptocurrency, three unnamed sources told the NYT. A further two told the newspaper that the importance of keeping the project under wraps is such that the relevant team has been given an office with separate key-card access to keep the details private from other employees.

Notably, five sources claiming to have been briefed on the team’s work alleged the forthcoming coin was most likely to be a fiat-pegged stablecoin — tied to the value of three different national fiat currencies, rather than just one.

The NYT notes, citing the anonymous sources, that Facebook has already begun shopping the “Facebook coin” around to unnamed crypto exchanges.

The question of centralization — and how far Facebook will allow its digital coin transactions to be decentralized, remains moot, according to NYT. Moreover, the Times cites industry experts who argued that Facebook is likely to face the same technological limitations and regulatory hurdles that have beset stalwart cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin (BTC).

As reported, unconfirmed reports of Facebook’s plans to integrate a cryptocurrency for WhatsApp users previously surfaced in December 2018. At the time, anonymous sources similarly suggested the token would be a stablecoin.

The trickle of information about the project aligns with the last year's job listings for blockchain talent on Facebook’s career page, as Cointelegraph has reported.
submitted by AllSparkChain to AllSparkChain [link] [comments]

CoinJoin with unconfirmed transaction?

Hey!

I'm not very technical so might be mistaken here. But I had more than 0,2 BTC and put it all in the Coinjoin queue. My first round was added to this transaction:
https://blockchair.com/bitcoin/transaction/005785c8d27ad1a670544af60f6cf6991b462c936c5b239a7927136128bbd530

Then I got the change of 0,1+ BTC back and it was automatically added to the next CoinJoin transaction:
https://blockchair.com/bitcoin/transaction/5ba115c2b870980f7de4a0d1d026a46e5a70332731aa3fcf995f898d307f52f6
But the first transaction was still unconfirmed, so I guess the output that was added in the second transaction was unconfirmed. The second transaction has a higher fee than the first (0.00015096 vs 0.00014208) so it's likely that the second transaction will be included in a block before the first. But then they will try to spend my change output from the first transaction that hasn't happened yet. Isn't this going to make the second transaction invalid or how is this resolved?

Wasabi Wallet shows the two amounts under the "send" tab as unconfirmed but with anonymity set 49.
submitted by Eken1388 to WasabiWallet [link] [comments]

History Lesson for new VIA Viacoin Investors

Viacoin is an open source cryptocurrency project, based on the Bitcoin blockchain. Publicly introduced on the crypto market in mid 2014, Viacoin integrates decentralized asset transaction on the blockchain, reaching speeds that have never seen before on cryptocurrencies. This Scrypt based, Proof of Work coin was created to try contrast Bitcoin’s structural problems, mainly the congested blockchain delays that inhibit microtransaction as this currency transitions from digital money to a gold-like, mean of solid value storage. Bitcoin Core developers Peter Todd and Btc have been working on this currency and ameliorated it until they was able to reach a lightning fast speed of 24 second per block. These incredible speeds are just one of the features that come with the implementation of Lightning Network, and and make Bitcoin slow transactions a thing of the past. To achieve such a dramatic improvement in performance, the developers modified Viacoin so that its OP_RETURN has been extended to 80 bytes, reducing tx and bloat sizes, overcoming multi signature hacks; the integration of ECDSA optimized C library allowed this coin to reach significant speedup for raw signature validation, making it perform up to 5 times better. This will mean easy adoption by merchants and vendors, which won’t have to worry anymore with long times between the payment and its approval. Todd role as Chief Scientist and Advisor has been proven the right choice for this coin, thanks to his focus on Tree Chains, a ground breaking feature that will fix the main problems revolving around Bitcoin, such as scalability issues and the troubles for the Viacoin miners to keep a reputation on the blockchain in a decentralized mining environment. Thanks to Todd’s expertise in sidechains, the future of this crypto currency will see the implementation of an alternative blockchain that is not linear. According to the developer, the chains are too unregulated when it comes to trying to establish a strong connection between the operations happening on one chain and what happens elsewhere. Merged mining, scalability and safety are at risk and tackling these problems is mandatory in order to create a new, disruptive crypto technology. Tree Chains are going to be the basis for a broader use and a series of protocols that are going to allow users and developers to use Viacoin’s blockchain not just to mine and store coins, but just like other new crypto currencies to allow the creation of secure, decentralized consensus systems living on the blockchain The commander role on this BIP9 compatible coin’s development team has now been taken by a programmer from the Netherlands called Romano, which has a great fan base in the cryptocurrency community thanks to his progressive views on the future of the world of cryptos. He’s in strong favor of SegWit, and considers soft forks on the chain not to be a problem but an opportunity: according to him it will provide an easy method to enable scripting upgrades and the implementation of other features that the market has been looking for, such as peer to peer layers for compact block relay. Segregation Witness allows increased capacity, ends transactions malleability, makes scripting upgradeable, and reduces UTXO set. Because of these reasons, Viacoin Core 0.13 is already SegWit ready and is awaiting for signaling.
Together with implementation of SegWit, Romano has recently been working on finalizing the implementation of merged mining, something that has never been done with altcoins. Merged mining allows users to mine more than one block chain at the same time, this means that every hash the miner does contributes to the total hash rate of all currencies, and as a result they are all more secure. This release pre-announcement resulted in a market spike, showing how interested the market is in the inclusion of these features in the coin core and blockchain. The developer has been introducing several of these features, ranging from a Hierarchical Deterministic key (HD key) generation that allows all Viacoin users to backup their wallets, to a compact block relay, which decreases block propagation times on the peer to peer network; this creates a healthier network and a better baseline relay security margin. Viacoin’s support for relative locktime allows users and miners to time-lock a transaction, this means that a new transaction will be prevented until a relative time change is achieved with a new OP code, OP_CHECKSEQUENCEVERITY, which allows the execution of a script based on the age of the amount that is being spent. Support for Child-Pays-For-Parent procedures in Viacoin has been successfully enabled, CPFP will alleviate the problem of transactions that stuck for a long period in the unconfirmed limbo, either because of network bottlenecks or lack of funds to pay the fee. Thanks to this method, an algorithm will selects transactions based on federate inclusive unconfirmed ancestor transaction; this means that a low fee transaction will be more likely to get picked up by miners if another transaction with an higher fee that speeds its output gets relayed. Several optimizations have been implemented in the blockchain to allow its scaling to proceed freely, ranging from pruning of the chain itsel to save disk space, to optimizing memory use thanks to mempool transaction filtering. UTXO cache has also been optimization, further allowing for significant faster transaction times. Anonymity of transaction has been ameliorated, thanks to increased TOR support by the development team. This feature will help keep this crypto currency secure and the identity of who works on it safe; this has been proven essential, especially considering how Viacoin’s future is right now focused on segwit and lightning network . Onion technology used in TOR has also been included in the routing of transactions, rapid payments and instant transaction on bi directional payment channels in total anonymity. Payments Viacoin’s anonymity is one of the main items of this year’s roadmap, and by the end of 2017 we’ll be able to see Viacoin’s latest secure payment technology, called Styx, implemented on its blockchain. This unlinkable anonymous atomic payment hub combines off-the-blockchain cryptographic computations, thanks to Viacoin’s scriptin functionalities, and makes use of security RSA assumptions, ROM and Elliptic Curve digital signature Algorithm; this will allow participants to make fast, anonymous transfer funds with zero knowledge contingent payment proof. Wallets already offer strong privacy, thanks to transactions being broadcasted once only; this increases anonymity, since it can’t be used to link IPs and TXs. In the future of this coin we’ll also see hardware wallets support reaching 100%, with Trezor and Nano ledger support. These small, key-chain devices connect to the user’s computer to store their private keys and sign transactions in a safe environment. Including Viacoin in these wallets is a smart move, because they are targeted towards people that are outside of hardcore cryptocurrency users circle and guarantees exposure to this currency. The more casual users hear of this coin, the faster they’re going to adopt it, being sure of it’s safety and reliability. In last October, Viacoin price has seen a strong decline, probably linked to one big online retailer building a decentralized crypto stock exchange based on the Counterparty protocol. As usual with crypto currencties, it’s easy to misunderstand the market fluctuations and assume that a temporary underperforming coin is a sign of lack of strength. The change in the development team certainly helped with Viacoin losing value, but by watching the coin graphs it’s easy to see how this momentary change in price is turning out to be just one of those gentle chart dips that precede a sky rocketing surge in price. Romano is working hard on features and focusing on their implementation, keeping his head low rather than pushing on strong marketing like other alt coins are doing. All this investment on ground breaking properties, most of which are unique to this coin, means that Viacoin is one of those well kept secret in the market. Minimal order books and lack of large investors offering liquidity also help keep this coin in a low-key position, something that is changing as support for larger books is growing. As soon as the market notices this coin and investments go up, we are going to see a rapid surge in the market price, around the 10000 mark by the beginning of January 2018 or late February. Instead of focusing on a public ICO like every altcoin, which means a sudden spike in price followed by inclusion on new exchanges that will dry up volume, this crypto coin is growing slowly under the radar while it’s being well tested and boxes on the roadmap get checked off, one after the other. Romano is constantly working on it and the community around this coin knows, such a strong pack of followers is a feature that no other alt currency has and it’s what will bring it back to the top of the coin market in the near future. His attitude towards miners that are opposed to SegWit is another strong feature to add to Viacoin, especially because of what he thinks of F2Pool and Bitmain’s politics towards soft forks. The Chinese mining groups seem scared that once alternative crypto coins switch to it they’re going to lose leveraging power for what concerns Bitcoin’s future and won’t be able to speculate on the mining and trading market as much as they have been doing in the past, especially for what concerns the marketing market.
It’s refreshing to see such dedication and releases being pushed at a constant manner, the only way to have structural changes in how crypto currencies work can only happen when the accent is put on development and not on just trying to convince the market. This strategy is less flashy and makes sure the road is ready for the inevitable increase in the userbase. It’s always difficult to forecast the future, especially when it concerns alternative coins when Bitcoin is raising so fast. A long term strategy suggestion would be to get around 1BTC worth of this cryptocoin as soon as possible and just hold on it: thanks to the features that are being rolled in as within 6 months there is going to be an easy gain to be made in the order of 5 to 10 times the initial investment. Using the recent market dip will make sure that the returns are maximized. What makes Viacoin an excellent opportunity right now is that the price is low and designed to rise fast, as its Lightning Network features become more mainstream. Lightning Network is secure, instant payment that aren’t going to be held back by confirmation bottlenecks, a blockchain capable to scale to the billions of transactions mark, extremely low fees that do not inhibit micropayments and cross-chain atomic swap that allow transaction across blockchain without the need of a third party custodians. These features mean that the future of this coin is going to be bright, and the the dip in price that started just a while ago is going to end soon as the market prepares for the first of August, when when the SegWit drama will affect all crypto markets. The overall trend of viacoin is bullish with a constant uptrend more media attention is expected , when news about the soft fork will spread beyond the inner circle of crypto aficionados and leak in the mainstream finance news networks. Solid coins like Viacoin, with a clear policy towards SegWit, will offer the guarantees that the market will be looking for in times of doubt. INVESTMENT REVIEW Investment Rating :- A+
https://medium.com/@VerthagOG/viacoin-investment-review-ca0982e979bd
submitted by alex61688 to viacoin [link] [comments]

Flux: Revisiting Near Blocks for Proof-of-Work Blockchains

Cryptology ePrint Archive: Report 2018/415
Date: 2018-05-29
Author(s): Alexei Zamyatin∗, Nicholas Stifter, Philipp Schindler, Edgar Weippl, William J. Knottenbelt∗

Link to Paper


Abstract
The term near or weak blocks describes Bitcoin blocks whose PoW does not meet the required target difficulty to be considered valid under the regular consensus rules of the protocol. Near blocks are generally associated with protocol improvement proposals striving towards shorter transaction confirmation times. Existing proposals assume miners will act rationally based solely on intrinsic incentives arising from the adoption of these changes, such as earlier detection of blockchain forks.
In this paper we present Flux, a protocol extension for proof-of-work blockchains that leverages on near blocks, a new block reward distribution mechanism, and an improved branch selection policy to incentivize honest participation of miners. Our protocol reduces mining variance, improves the responsiveness of the underlying blockchain in terms of transaction processing, and can be deployed without conflicting modifications to the underlying base protocol as a velvet fork. We perform an initial analysis of selfish mining which suggests Flux not only provides security guarantees similar to pure Nakamoto consensus, but potentially renders selfish mining strategies less profitable.

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submitted by dj-gutz to myrXiv [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/Bitcoin] r/Bitcoin recap - February 2018

The following post by SamWouters is being replicated because some comments within the post(but not the post itself) have been silently removed.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ Bitcoin/comments/818fkc
The original post's content was as follows:
Hi Bitcoiners!
I’m back with the fourteenth monthly Bitcoin news recap.
For those unfamiliar, each day I pick out the most popularelevant/interesting stories in Bitcoin and save them. At the end of the month I release them in one batch, to give you a quick (but not necessarily the best) overview of what happened in bitcoin over the past month.
You can see recaps of the previous months on Bitcoinsnippets.com
A recap of Bitcoin in February 2018
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: Bitcoin top posts from 2017-10-15 to 2018-10-14 18:01 PDT

Period: 364.20 days
Submissions Comments
Total 1000 265073
Rate (per day) 2.75 722.33
Unique Redditors 812 63529
Combined Score 3662639 3145604

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 74796 points, 2 submissions: Tricky_Troll
    1. The last 3 months in 47 seconds. (48474 points, 790 comments)
    2. Bitcoin Doesn't Give a Fuck. (26322 points, 1505 comments)
  2. 50907 points, 3 submissions: LeeWallis
    1. It's official! 1 Bitcoin = $10,000 USD (48506 points, 4587 comments)
    2. It's official! 1 Bitcoin = $10,000 USD (again) (1233 points, 123 comments)
    3. Bitcoin just reached $7,000 USD on GDAX! (1168 points, 359 comments)
  3. 49298 points, 2 submissions: chronic_nervosa
    1. Working Hard or Hardly Working? (25721 points, 326 comments)
    2. Investing Tips from a Pro (23577 points, 598 comments)
  4. 44144 points, 2 submissions: wolfwolfz
    1. It's over 9000!!! (42429 points, 3170 comments)
    2. Mtgox caused 2013 and 2018 crash (1715 points, 425 comments)
  5. 42048 points, 1 submission: buttockpain
    1. Everyone who's trading BTC right now (42048 points, 804 comments)
  6. 41614 points, 3 submissions: PineappleFund
    1. I'm donating 5057 BTC to charitable causes! Introducing The Pineapple Fund (20020 points, 2927 comments)
    2. Farewell from the Pineapple Fund (10944 points, 610 comments)
    3. 🍍 $4mil will fund MDMA trials for PTSD; marked 'Breakthrough Therapy' by FDA. Pineapple Fund is matching MAPS donations 1:1. Reddit, let's make history by crowdfunding an incredible treatment for PTSD, in bitcoin! (10650 points, 558 comments)
  7. 41269 points, 4 submissions: Xtreme110
    1. Bitcoin.. The King (28328 points, 1178 comments)
    2. So here's what actually happened Today. (8542 points, 301 comments)
    3. So Yeah This Happened .. (2330 points, 215 comments)
    4. Did someone Asked for Support levels... (2069 points, 224 comments)
  8. 29323 points, 1 submission: KINNAHZ
    1. I hope James is doing well (29323 points, 1242 comments)
  9. 29123 points, 1 submission: trance929
    1. Weeeeeeee! (29123 points, 1530 comments)
  10. 28063 points, 1 submission: benjaminikuta
    1. Nothing can increase by that much and still be a good investment. (28063 points, 1318 comments)
  11. 27600 points, 5 submissions: Suberg
    1. Rabobank Fined $369M for Money Laundering After Calling Bitcoin a Risk for Money Laundering (14264 points, 312 comments)
    2. Ellen DeGeneres Just Introduced Bitcoin to Her 3 Million US Viewers (7893 points, 619 comments)
    3. Evidence Emerges of CNBC Collusion with Roger Ver, BCash (2665 points, 526 comments)
    4. Reminder: Encrypt and store your bitcoin offline - U.S. Congress Quietly Passes CLOUD Act to Increase Gov't Access to Online Info (1688 points, 277 comments)
    5. 600+ Bitcoin Users Seek Lawsuit Against Bitcoin.com & CEO Roger Ver for Fraud (1090 points, 298 comments)
  12. 26949 points, 1 submission: Kittstar123
    1. This is why I want bitcoin to hit $10,000 (26949 points, 918 comments)
  13. 24897 points, 2 submissions: sunilross
    1. What he would be wishing now? 😂 (22418 points, 954 comments)
    2. Just a few months ago Bitcoin going to $10,000 was a huge celebration Now Bitcoin is at $10,000 and its like the end of the world. What an irony!! (2479 points, 1016 comments)
  14. 24555 points, 8 submissions: TheGreatMuffin
    1. This Bitcoin chart is insane! Oh, wait… that’s actually a chart of US dollar money printing. (8202 points, 1165 comments)
    2. Coinbase Hit With Class Action Claiming Insiders Benefited From 'Bitcoin Cash' Launch (5370 points, 493 comments)
    3. "Anonymous bitcoin donor rains $56 million on stunned nonprofits" (story about The Pinapple Fund) (3331 points, 199 comments)
    4. Odds of winning Powerball (Lottery) vs guessing one bitcoin private key (by @Coinguybri) (2008 points, 260 comments)
    5. Andreas Antonopoulos' depiction of the day he became aware of the donations that made him a millionaire (1878 points, 214 comments)
    6. McAfee doubles down on his promise: "I now predict Bitcoin at $1 million by the end of 2020. I will still eat my dick if wrong." (1387 points, 329 comments)
    7. Federal courts now accepting cryptocurrency for bail (1288 points, 62 comments)
    8. The first Stable version of BTCPay is out: BTCPayServer 1.0.1.1 and NBXplorer 1.0.1.3. Next stable version will include Lightning Network. (by Nicolas Dorier) (1091 points, 103 comments)
  15. 23962 points, 6 submissions: Mobilenewsflash
    1. Difference between New and Experienced Trader (11900 points, 181 comments)
    2. Did you know? I didn't. (4127 points, 294 comments)
    3. Altcoin Master (3555 points, 145 comments)
    4. All we need is this kind of bull run! (2125 points, 122 comments)
    5. Bitcoin isn't the bubble, it's the pin (1199 points, 310 comments)
    6. Simple answer, the right one (1056 points, 230 comments)
  16. 23651 points, 3 submissions: UniqueUsername642
    1. Cheers! (17238 points, 510 comments)
    2. This is Cryptocurrency (5072 points, 371 comments)
    3. Bitcoin Investors be like (1341 points, 335 comments)
  17. 23082 points, 1 submission: jrs0080
    1. Whoever put this up deserves a medal (23082 points, 319 comments)
  18. 23066 points, 1 submission: vindico_silenti
    1. BTC dropping due to lack of quality 11k memes. Closest support line is at 9k Vegeta memes. (23066 points, 820 comments)
  19. 22856 points, 1 submission: danielwilson666
    1. Bitcoin today (22856 points, 1940 comments)
  20. 22657 points, 1 submission: byte_coder
    1. 2018: lets run for office (22657 points, 991 comments)
  21. 22193 points, 1 submission: Hync
    1. Lily Allen turned down 200K in Bitcoins for a gig in 2009 which is worth $1,426,199,000 as of this writing (22193 points, 1293 comments)
  22. 21505 points, 1 submission: paperraincoat
    1. Eleven! (21505 points, 575 comments)
  23. 21044 points, 1 submission: SotakuKun
    1. How To Invest In Bitcoin (21044 points, 634 comments)
  24. 20817 points, 1 submission: MichKOG
    1. Almost everyone now is an Investor (20817 points, 554 comments)
  25. 20647 points, 10 submissions: Bastiat
    1. Day 2: I will repost this guide daily until available solutions like Segwit & order batching are adopted, the mempool is empty once again, and transaction fees are low. You can help. Take action today (5145 points, 766 comments)
    2. Pierre Rochard: "Until your altcoin successfully defeats a coordinated attack like NYA/S2X, with 90% of the hashrate and major businesses trying to force a hard fork, its immutability is untested and its monetary policy is suspect. Bitcoin has earned its keep, its immutability is beyond question" (2249 points, 345 comments)
    3. Day 9: I will post this guide regularly until available solutions like SegWit, order batching, and Lightning payment channels are mass adopted, the mempool is empty once again, and tx fees are low. Have you done your part? (2070 points, 190 comments)
    4. Day 5: I will post this guide regularly until available solutions like SegWit & order batching are mass adopted, the mempool is empty once again, and transaction fees are low. User demand from this community can help lead to some big changes. Have you joined the /Bitcoin SegWit effort? (2017 points, 268 comments)
    5. Day 7: I will post this guide regularly until available solutions like SegWit & order batching are mass adopted, the mempool is empty once again, and tx fees are low. Do you want low tx fees, because this is how you get low tx fees (1959 points, 166 comments)
    6. Day 3: I will repost this guide daily until available solutions like SegWit & order batching are mass adopted, the mempool is empty once again, and transaction fees are low. ARE YOU PART OF THE SOLUTION? News: Unconfirmed TX's @ 274K, more exchanges adding SegWit, Core prioritizes SegWit GUI (1758 points, 220 comments)
    7. Coinbase's short-sighted money grab is @Gemini.com's gain. Trust is the number one concern for new adopters and nobody can trust CONBASE after today (1689 points, 383 comments)
    8. Day 8: I will post this guide regularly until available solutions like SegWit, order batching, and Lightning payment channels are mass adopted, the mempool is empty once again, and tx fees are low. BTC Core SegWit GUI coming May 1, Coinbase incompetence exposed, more exchanges deploy SegWit (1454 points, 177 comments)
    9. Day 6: I will post this guide regularly until available solutions like SegWit & order batching are mass adopted, the mempool is empty once again, and tx fees are low. Refer a friend to SegWit today. There's no $10 referral offer, but you'll both get lower fees and help strengthen the BTC protocol (1193 points, 99 comments)
    10. If every Bitcoin tx was a SegWit tx today, we'd have 8,000 tx blocks & the tx backlog would disappear. Tx fees would be almost non-existent once again. THE NEXT BITCOIN TX YOU MAKE, MAKE IT A SEGWIT TX. DOWNLOAD A SEGWIT COMPATIBLE WALLET AND OPEN A SEGWIT COMPATIBLE EXCHANGE ACCOUNT RIGHT NOW (1113 points, 228 comments)
  26. 20159 points, 1 submission: swahlgren
    1. Danish Bitcoin billionaire new sponsor of professional Danish ice hockey team. Stadium to be renamed "Bitcoin Arena" and get a huge Bitcoin logo in the middle of the ice! (20159 points, 1018 comments)
  27. 20119 points, 4 submissions: bitchari
    1. Value is always in the eyes of the beholder (10999 points, 542 comments)
    2. We did it!! BTC ✌️ (4335 points, 333 comments)
    3. Uncomfortable truths!! (3228 points, 451 comments)
    4. "rat poison" returns!! (1557 points, 234 comments)
  28. 19767 points, 1 submission: Active2017
    1. $7,900+!! (am i doing this right?) (19767 points, 493 comments)
  29. 18709 points, 1 submission: JonathanMauri
    1. Sold some bitcoin to buy my new best bud 🤗 (18709 points, 1752 comments)
  30. 17979 points, 1 submission: crlxzzz
    1. Localbitcoins.com is illegally holding my 9.3 bitcoin on "escrow" since may 2015 (17979 points, 802 comments)
  31. 17806 points, 6 submissions: domelane
    1. FORBES: "South Korea Is Not Banning Bitcoin Trade, Financial Regulators Clarify". (8349 points, 245 comments)
    2. Banks vs Bitcoin (2370 points, 311 comments)
    3. Arizona Senate Votes to Accept Tax Payments in Bitcoin (2363 points, 134 comments)
    4. Visa confirms Coinbase wasn’t at fault for overcharging users (1854 points, 92 comments)
    5. Finally! Coinbase: "Our engineering team has finished testing of SegWit for Bitcoin on Coinbase. We will be starting a phased launch to customers over the next few days and are targeting a 100% launch to all customers by mid next week". (1501 points, 112 comments)
    6. For all the newbies posting: "Bitcoin will crash on Monday! Wall Street is buying to short it to hell!", watch Andreas (Member of the Oversight Board of the CME Futures) to calm your tits. (1369 points, 322 comments)
  32. 17749 points, 2 submissions: BluntLord
    1. possibly the worst thing about this crash... (11631 points, 2540 comments)
    2. Reasons why these price increases are NOT a good thing. no FUD, all facts. (6118 points, 394 comments)
  33. 17228 points, 1 submission: ma_Name_Is_Jefffff
    1. To the new guys, let's see how tough you really are (17228 points, 1371 comments)
  34. 17117 points, 4 submissions: ayanamirs
    1. Don't be this guy (11774 points, 728 comments)
    2. Satoshi Nakamoto about bitcoin.com (2337 points, 313 comments)
    3. SegWit transactions are now 30.71%! (1892 points, 198 comments)
    4. SegWit, Lightning Network, and Schnorr are way more important than the current price. (1114 points, 166 comments)
  35. 16889 points, 1 submission: bitnext
    1. There are 180 different scenarios where bitcoin go. If any one thing happens remember me i am the first one to predict this (16889 points, 452 comments)
  36. 16350 points, 1 submission: YetAnotherCryptoFan
    1. Warren Buffet: (16350 points, 990 comments)
  37. 16128 points, 1 submission: lewjc
    1. Quick analysis of the markets this month (16128 points, 349 comments)
  38. 15721 points, 1 submission: bitiegg
    1. Guys... I'm out... (15721 points, 814 comments)
  39. 15216 points, 1 submission: CryptoCurrencyFreak
    1. The Free Software Foundation has received a 91.45 Bitcoin donation from the Pineapple Fund. Valued at $1 Million USD. (15216 points, 423 comments)
  40. 15144 points, 4 submissions: StoneHammers
    1. exceedingly efficient (7954 points, 205 comments)
    2. Behold my 20 Bitcoin lawnmower bought mid 2012 (4214 points, 289 comments)
    3. This could change everything (1900 points, 68 comments)
    4. Bitcoin today (1076 points, 114 comments)
  41. 14847 points, 1 submission: cryptograffiti
    1. Upvote to get this to the top search result for "Bitcoin CEO." (14847 points, 265 comments)
  42. 14823 points, 6 submissions: Bitzone4
    1. Mood Currently. (6084 points, 448 comments)
    2. Hodlers currently (2882 points, 314 comments)
    3. Lets goooo yes bitcoin (2362 points, 280 comments)
    4. Holders Power (1444 points, 160 comments)
    5. Meanwhile when there's blood in the street. (1032 points, 106 comments)
    6. Who else took the discount opportunity? (1019 points, 209 comments)
  43. 14808 points, 1 submission: ltc-
    1. What a time to be alive! (14808 points, 467 comments)
  44. 14807 points, 1 submission: nrckprth
    1. When you are trying to buy the dip (14807 points, 660 comments)
  45. 14761 points, 2 submissions: zackwong97
    1. Quick grab the offer! (12316 points, 835 comments)
    2. 100 years has past and a new currency was discovered. I believe cryptocurrency can save the world. (2445 points, 221 comments)
  46. 14624 points, 1 submission: lawmaster99
    1. Microsoft joins Steam and stops accepting Bitcoin payments (14624 points, 2163 comments)
  47. 14236 points, 1 submission: kixxaxxas
    1. Yeah! Bitcoin! (14236 points, 496 comments)
  48. 13950 points, 1 submission: EaFaer
    1. Us Senate Bill S.1241 to criminalize concealed ownership of Bitcoin (13950 points, 1621 comments)
  49. 13929 points, 7 submissions: finalhedge
    1. Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak: “Bitcoin is mathematical. I am a mathematician. There are only 21 million. It is more legitimate than other systems” (3984 points, 487 comments)
    2. Mum knows best (2474 points, 149 comments)
    3. Wall Street Journal has gone from worrying that Bitcoin is a bubble that will crash, to worrying that it's not (2432 points, 440 comments)
    4. Hedge Fund Manager Mark Yusko: "Only gamble was whether Bitcoin would make if from $0 to $100-- that was the real miracle. Going from $4,000 to $400,000 is easy" (1755 points, 272 comments)
    5. Those who scoffed at the thought of $1,000 BTC are scoffing at $10,000 BTC and will scoff at $100,000 BTC (1163 points, 342 comments)
    6. Barry Silbert could make Bitcoin soar to $7,000+ & his own Assets Under Management to $1.5B+ with 1 tweet: call off SegWit2X & uncertainty will be out of the market. (1074 points, 189 comments)
    7. Google gets it. (1047 points, 46 comments)
  50. 13912 points, 4 submissions: readish
    1. Bitcoin is going to do to banks what email did the post office and Amazon did to retail. (7194 points, 1137 comments)
    2. ... hey, Coinbase... (3293 points, 492 comments)
    3. Yes, please! (2342 points, 325 comments)
    4. Calling Bitcoin Cash the "real" Bitcoin is straightforward fraud, and will financially wreck many new investors entering the ecosystem by buying a fake coin. So, exposing frauds is a nice thing to do for other people to prevent them from falling for those scams. (1083 points, 400 comments)
  51. 13876 points, 1 submission: theymos
    1. Don't invest recklessly (13876 points, 1972 comments)
  52. 13839 points, 1 submission: virtualwoman0
    1. Thank you Coinbase!! For taking sooo long to validate my identity, my account, and my bank transfers...your endless delays prevented me from investing in the crypto market before the crash! (13839 points, 556 comments)
  53. 13817 points, 2 submissions: xcryptogurux
    1. Don't be like Greg (9887 points, 370 comments)
    2. Lesson - History of Bitcoin crashes (3930 points, 1676 comments)
  54. 13546 points, 2 submissions: D3M0Sthenes
    1. Can you feel the Pumpening? (12469 points, 436 comments)
    2. There's always that guy at the party (1077 points, 61 comments)
  55. 13507 points, 2 submissions: pc_to_mac_user
    1. Keeping Coinbase on their toes - Robinhood adds no-fee crypto trading! (12040 points, 909 comments)
    2. Coinbase CEO: In the next 3–5 years, you will see countries going into economic crisis and could see the organic adoption of cryptocurrencies (1467 points, 363 comments)
  56. 13489 points, 3 submissions: Godfreee
    1. It was a sad day when we had to retire this meme from our wall after 3.5 years. Next one will have an added zero! (10196 points, 237 comments)
    2. Back in 2013, a single subway sandwich shop accepting Bitcoin got airtime on CNBC, and we were all jumping for joy. Nowadays we get full TV features about Bitcoin and people are like " yawn, could be better". (2020 points, 110 comments)
    3. This magazine cover came out exactly 30 years ago - same day Bitcoin was released 9 years ago. Was Satoshi that meta? 2018 is gonna be a helluva ride. (1273 points, 301 comments)
  57. 13293 points, 2 submissions: ccjunkiemonkey
    1. Sixty free lectures from Princeton on bitcoin and cryptocurrencies. Total time 13hr 20min. Links in post. (12259 points, 206 comments)
    2. Don't panic, just learn. Sixty free lectures from Princeton on bitcoin and cryptocurrencies. Total time 13hr 20min. Links in post. (1034 points, 97 comments)
  58. 12875 points, 1 submission: DebtFreeMFers
    1. Guys, I am out (12875 points, 1572 comments)
  59. 12651 points, 1 submission: lriccardo
    1. I spent 3 months building one of the best apps to track cryptocurrencies. Exchanges API sync, wallet tracking and many other features. I am not 16 but I invested a lot of time into this, can I get some attention anyway or am I going to get randomly downvoted as always? The app is also free. (12651 points, 1563 comments)
  60. 12558 points, 3 submissions: agent9747
    1. How to transfer Bitcoin from Coinbase for free! (10322 points, 809 comments)
    2. Stop hating on Coinbase (1210 points, 563 comments)
    3. My Cryptocurrency app is starting to look good :D It will be available soon-ish (1026 points, 193 comments)
  61. 12489 points, 1 submission: tune_down
    1. Insider tip: BTC is going to skyrocket in the next 48 hours (12489 points, 741 comments)
  62. 12328 points, 1 submission: i_mash_shoryuken
    1. This month in Bitcoin. (12328 points, 371 comments)
  63. 12069 points, 1 submission: Ev1lyv35
    1. This hurts me in a different level. (12069 points, 593 comments)
  64. 11898 points, 4 submissions: tinaclark90
    1. I've made some free Bitcoin Icons (4747 points, 246 comments)
    2. Thought I might share this in here. No way Bitcoin is going to survive folks... (4657 points, 824 comments)
    3. New Free Bitcoin Icons (1285 points, 71 comments)
    4. Bitcoin Icons (100% Free) (1209 points, 64 comments)
  65. 11618 points, 1 submission: timbroddin
    1. 9 years ago block 0 was mined. Happy birthday Bitcoin! (11618 points, 455 comments)
  66. 11429 points, 1 submission: tomerux
    1. We waited for that... (11429 points, 186 comments)
  67. 11381 points, 1 submission: sykhlo
    1. And that's why we need limited supply. (11381 points, 803 comments)
  68. 11357 points, 2 submissions: sbrdx
    1. Bitcoiners be like 😂 (9418 points, 413 comments)
    2. When you HODL through a bear market (1939 points, 108 comments)
  69. 11339 points, 1 submission: CosmosKing98
    1. This is governments trying to regulate bitcoin. (11339 points, 549 comments)
  70. 11198 points, 1 submission: Ryamgram
    1. <---- Number of Hodlers with Strong Hands (11198 points, 1127 comments)
  71. 11079 points, 2 submissions: ForeverDutch92
    1. Dutch national newspaper urges people to sell all their Bitcoins as it undermines the government, could destabilise the economy and reduces the power of central banks. Sounds like a reason to buy to me 🤔 (9843 points, 986 comments)
    2. We really need to start pushing for SegWit support. Stop waiting for the Lightning Network to fix everything. (1236 points, 318 comments)
  72. 11063 points, 5 submissions: amorpisseur
    1. South Korean gov't "shocked" at the number of citizens requesting the removal of Justice Minister and Finance Minister for market manipulation (4015 points, 236 comments)
    2. BREAKING: TD Ameritrade to allow bitcoin futures trading Monday (2571 points, 234 comments)
    3. "Microsoft and Starbucks signed on to use the new platform for payments and accept BTC" (2190 points, 330 comments)
    4. We found who's spamming the mempool (1162 points, 207 comments)
    5. Lightning Network progress: 72 out of 75 tests pass! (1125 points, 562 comments)
  73. 11010 points, 1 submission: Sam767679
    1. Legendary story by John McAfee (11010 points, 472 comments)
  74. 10959 points, 1 submission: InteractiveLedger
    1. This is NOT OK. Upvote for visibility (10959 points, 1505 comments)
  75. 10750 points, 1 submission: singularityissonear
    1. Time to invest! (10750 points, 329 comments)
  76. 10749 points, 1 submission: broscientologist
    1. I made a decision tree for everyone panic selling. (10749 points, 896 comments)
  77. 10688 points, 1 submission: K_owar_D
    1. They never told me that buying the lambo would be the easy part... (10688 points, 495 comments)
  78. 10626 points, 1 submission: bigbenxx
    1. Checking the Bitcoin price at work: (10626 points, 328 comments)
  79. 10419 points, 1 submission: EMC2_trooper
    1. I see it every day. (10419 points, 289 comments)
  80. 10330 points, 1 submission: LAH92
    1. The latecomer’s BTC journey (10330 points, 271 comments)
  81. 10324 points, 1 submission: old-man-blorp
    1. It would be so easy then (10324 points, 222 comments)
  82. 10187 points, 1 submission: mrtambourineman89
    1. BTC Grandpa already doubled his profit. (10187 points, 597 comments)
  83. 10027 points, 2 submissions: David3692
    1. Looking at the price when you invested only what you can afford to lose (7560 points, 744 comments)
    2. Trying to explain to the wife why we should buy more now (2467 points, 260 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. viper2097 (11931 points, 7 comments)
  2. TarAldarion (6814 points, 3 comments)
  3. gonzobon (6174 points, 95 comments)
  4. cxr303 (5782 points, 29 comments)
  5. Annu_Naki (5537 points, 1 comment)
  6. nightspy1309 (5501 points, 1 comment)
  7. stevoli (5476 points, 4 comments)
  8. PineappleFund (5450 points, 45 comments)
  9. gregschoen (5426 points, 21 comments)
  10. gkikoria (5353 points, 1 comment)
  11. StarfighterF104gv2 (5320 points, 2 comments)
  12. devonthed00d (5228 points, 47 comments)
  13. typtyphus (5186 points, 174 comments)
  14. LeeWallis (4989 points, 19 comments)
  15. Graphesium (4956 points, 1 comment)
  16. SirBastian (4640 points, 2 comments)
  17. zomgitsduke (4617 points, 176 comments)
  18. bluethunder1985 (4586 points, 133 comments)
  19. anumoshsad (4494 points, 3 comments)
  20. MagicalTux (4480 points, 111 comments)
  21. Mateo113 (4456 points, 3 comments)
  22. dolan_trumpf (4398 points, 3 comments)
  23. domelane (4157 points, 44 comments)
  24. walloon5 (4143 points, 307 comments)
  25. prelsidente (4088 points, 91 comments)
  26. gozaamaya (4029 points, 5 comments)
  27. maaku7 (3976 points, 63 comments)
  28. basmith7 (3950 points, 1 comment)
  29. Agastopia (3869 points, 6 comments)
  30. toxonaut (3756 points, 1 comment)
  31. Speaking-of-segues (3707 points, 117 comments)
  32. PuckFoloniex (3701 points, 37 comments)
  33. isoldmywifeonEbay (3676 points, 100 comments)
  34. mpbh (3558 points, 14 comments)
  35. tranceology3 (3513 points, 252 comments)
  36. Opfailicon (3493 points, 2 comments)
  37. hallizh (3448 points, 3 comments)
  38. 1Bitcoinco (3446 points, 22 comments)
  39. overtoke (3446 points, 14 comments)
  40. coinx-ltc (3401 points, 3 comments)
  41. Shmeh-Shmeh (3365 points, 3 comments)
  42. SternerCrow (3301 points, 22 comments)
  43. Active2017 (3263 points, 35 comments)
  44. mr_li_jr (3204 points, 29 comments)
  45. abolishpmo (3050 points, 19 comments)
  46. Redcrux (3042 points, 10 comments)
  47. lucky_rabbit_foot (3035 points, 41 comments)
  48. FDisk80 (3027 points, 10 comments)
  49. TheGreatMuffin (3009 points, 189 comments)
  50. HazyPeanut (3000 points, 3 comments)
  51. LegendsRoom (2992 points, 58 comments)
  52. 2Panik (2964 points, 5 comments)
  53. fellesh (2952 points, 3 comments)
  54. GenghisKhanSpermShot (2933 points, 171 comments)
  55. suninabox (2929 points, 466 comments)
  56. BlatantConservative (2896 points, 28 comments)
  57. tyrael98 (2891 points, 2 comments)
  58. mbrochh (2890 points, 100 comments)
  59. hungry4donutz (2866 points, 3 comments)
  60. WhoNeedsFacts (2809 points, 2 comments)
  61. greatbawlsofire (2792 points, 2 comments)
  62. pg3crypto (2791 points, 67 comments)
  63. Anon7216 (2791 points, 13 comments)
  64. togetherwem0m0 (2789 points, 64 comments)
  65. StrictlyOffTheRecord (2787 points, 4 comments)
  66. jonivaio (2777 points, 3 comments)
  67. BTCChampion (2752 points, 11 comments)
  68. yung_yas (2752 points, 3 comments)
  69. Chowdahhhh (2744 points, 4 comments)
  70. ADustedEwok (2723 points, 8 comments)
  71. CONTROLurKEYS (2715 points, 303 comments)
  72. strange_fate (2671 points, 36 comments)
  73. Downvotesohoy (2664 points, 6 comments)
  74. daghanerdonmez (2646 points, 5 comments)
  75. Saschb2b (2633 points, 1 comment)
  76. ebaley (2627 points, 1008 comments)
  77. catVdog123 (2619 points, 67 comments)
  78. ducksauce88 (2593 points, 280 comments)
  79. leroyyrogers (2593 points, 39 comments)
  80. PM_UR_UGLY_SWEATERS (2582 points, 9 comments)
  81. Cryptolution (2575 points, 310 comments)
  82. CryptoBobs (2530 points, 3 comments)
  83. Beckneard (2527 points, 39 comments)
  84. gbitg (2515 points, 85 comments)
  85. Kooriki (2511 points, 220 comments)
  86. ILikeToSayHi (2475 points, 24 comments)
  87. SPOKANARCHY (2472 points, 1 comment)
  88. letterboxmind (2469 points, 102 comments)
  89. lawmaster99 (2447 points, 30 comments)
  90. Reverend_James (2445 points, 74 comments)
  91. time_wasted504 (2439 points, 88 comments)
  92. TheBoyChris (2432 points, 4 comments)
  93. Frogolocalypse (2409 points, 518 comments)
  94. lriccardo (2388 points, 119 comments)
  95. __Vet__ (2372 points, 53 comments)
  96. ep1939 (2358 points, 133 comments)
  97. BBA935 (2339 points, 22 comments)
  98. Marcion_Sinope (2333 points, 210 comments)
  99. beamybeams (2323 points, 12 comments)
  100. Sawyeee (2309 points, 2 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. It's official! 1 Bitcoin = $10,000 USD by LeeWallis (48506 points, 4587 comments)
  2. The last 3 months in 47 seconds. by Tricky_Troll (48474 points, 790 comments)
  3. It's over 9000!!! by wolfwolfz (42429 points, 3170 comments)
  4. Everyone who's trading BTC right now by buttockpain (42048 points, 804 comments)
  5. I hope James is doing well by KINNAHZ (29323 points, 1242 comments)
  6. Weeeeeeee! by trance929 (29123 points, 1530 comments)
  7. Bitcoin.. The King by Xtreme110 (28328 points, 1178 comments)
  8. Nothing can increase by that much and still be a good investment. by benjaminikuta (28063 points, 1318 comments)
  9. This is why I want bitcoin to hit $10,000 by Kittstar123 (26949 points, 918 comments)
  10. Bitcoin Doesn't Give a Fuck. by Tricky_Troll (26322 points, 1505 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 11914 points: viper2097's comment in I hope James is doing well
  2. 9195 points: deleted's comment in possibly the worst thing about this crash...
  3. 6799 points: TarAldarion's comment in It's official! 1 Bitcoin = $10,000 USD
  4. 6589 points: deleted's comment in Nothing can increase by that much and still be a good investment.
  5. 6158 points: deleted's comment in My brother killed himself because of BTC
  6. 5537 points: Annu_Naki's comment in What he would be wishing now? 😂
  7. 5501 points: nightspy1309's comment in BTC dropping due to lack of quality 11k memes. Closest support line is at 9k Vegeta memes.
  8. 5410 points: stevoli's comment in Insider tip: BTC is going to skyrocket in the next 48 hours
  9. 5353 points: gkikoria's comment in Weeeeeeee!
  10. 5325 points: cxr303's comment in Guys, I am out
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
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